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I am curious why in Python a trailing comma in a list is valid syntax, and it seems that Python simply ignores it:

>>> ['a','b',]
['a', 'b']

It makes sense when its a tuple since ('a') and ('a',) are two different things, but in lists?

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2  
@BrenBarn Did you read that question? This is definitely a different question. –  Peter Smit Jul 22 '12 at 5:32
2  
The question is phrased differently, but the answers answer this question. –  BrenBarn Jul 22 '12 at 5:34
    
@BrenBarn: I can't imagine what you found in that question about tuple syntax that answers the question about lists. The OP even mentions the distinction. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 22 '12 at 12:19
    
Commas in 1-tuple shorthand syntax is a special case and makes the most sense when viewed that way. Without the trailing comma a = (1) is viewed by the interpreter as an unpack operation on the right hand side and is equivalent to a = 1. I'd never use the shorthand syntax when a = tuple([1]) is so much more explicit. The shorthand may predate the tuple() factory, but I don't care enough to find out. –  msw Jul 22 '12 at 13:37
    
The accepted answer for that question says "The trailing comma for tuples, lists, or function arguments is good style especially when you have a long initialisation that is split over multiple lines." and gives an example with a list. Other answers also mention that the same applies to lists, dicts, etc. The diff argument is also mentioned. –  BrenBarn Jul 22 '12 at 18:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

The main advantages are that it makes multi-line lists easier to edit and that it reduces clutter in diffs.

Changing:

s = ['manny',
     'mo',
     'jack',
]

to:

s = ['manny',
     'mo',
     'jack',
     'roger',
]

involves only a one-line change in the diff:

  s = ['manny',
       'mo',
       'jack',
+      'roger',
  ]

This beats the more confusing multi-line diff when the trailing comma was omitted:

  s = ['manny',
       'mo',
-      'jack'
+      'jack',
+      'roger'
  ]

The latter diff makes it harder to see that only one line was added and that the other line didn't change content.

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2  
This makes the (most) sense, but I would really be surprised if the parser of the language was designed to make diffs easier. –  Burhan Khalid Jul 22 '12 at 6:00
8  
@BurhanKhalid: Language designers are programmers, and programmers do many things to make their lives easier. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 22 '12 at 6:14
    
@BurhanKhalid Not so much to make things easier for the diff program; rather, the goal is to make it easier for humans to make and review edits. –  Raymond Hettinger Jul 22 '12 at 6:15
1  
@Burhan If you don't believe that explanation, how about that it's also simpler to define the grammar that way? ;) Compare List = "[" {Item ","} "]". vs. List = "[" ({Item","}Item|)"]". –  Voo Jul 22 '12 at 12:41
1  
This also makes it easier for other programs to autogenerate code -- it's much easier to just print "\"item\"," for each item than it is to print "\"item\"" for each item followed by "," for all but the last item. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 26 '13 at 20:05

It's a common syntactical convention to allow trailing commas in an array, languages like C and Java allow it, and Python seems to have adopted this convention for its list data structure. It's particularly useful when generating code for populating a list: just generate a sequence of elements and commas, no need to consider the last one as an special case that doesn't have a comma at the end.

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It helps to eliminate a certain kind of bug. It's sometimes clearer to write lists on multiple lines. But in, later maintenace you may want to rearrange the items.

l1 = [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        4,
        5
]

# Now you want to rearrange

l1 = [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        5
        4,
]

# Now you have an error

But if you allow trailing commas, and use them, you can easily rearrange the lines without introducing an error.

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This is neat, but you can avoid this by pre-pending the comma. I do that all the time when writing SQL –  Burhan Khalid Jul 22 '12 at 5:21
10  
Even if you prepend the comma to each element, you still have to omit the comma on the first one. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 22 '12 at 5:25
4  
Also prepending the comma looks just god-awful. Python should approximate english (i.e. easily readable) and punctuation goes at the end of the line not at the start. –  Voo Jul 22 '12 at 12:42

A tuple is different because ('a') is expanded using implicit continuation and ()s as a precendence operator, whereas ('a'), refers to a length 1 tuple.

Your original example would have been tuple('a')

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('a'), is a string; but my point was that trailing commas in tuples are significant, but in lists they don't appear to be yet Python accepts them. –  Burhan Khalid Jul 22 '12 at 5:58
1  
They're silently discarded in both cases, it's just that in a tuple it's needed to differentiate it from a string in bracket. –  richo Jul 22 '12 at 17:03

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