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I was looking to be able to turn any UIColor into a gradient. The way I am intending to do this is by using Core Graphics to draw a gradient. What I am trying to do is to get a color, lets say:

[UIColor colorWithRed:0.5 green:0.5 blue:0.5 alpha:1.0];

and get a UIColor which is a few shades darker and a few shades lighter. Does anyone know how to do this? Thank you.

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1  
"gradient" implies that one portion of your image will be one shade of the color while another portion will be a darker or lighter shade. Is this another way of defining what you want to do? –  Michael Dautermann Jul 22 '12 at 6:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 149 down vote accepted
- (UIColor *)lighterColorForColor:(UIColor *)c
{
    CGFloat r, g, b, a;
    if ([c getRed:&r green:&g blue:&b alpha:&a])
        return [UIColor colorWithRed:MIN(r + 0.2, 1.0)
                               green:MIN(g + 0.2, 1.0)
                                blue:MIN(b + 0.2, 1.0)
                               alpha:a];
    return nil;
}

- (UIColor *)darkerColorForColor:(UIColor *)c
{
    CGFloat r, g, b, a;
    if ([c getRed:&r green:&g blue:&b alpha:&a])
        return [UIColor colorWithRed:MAX(r - 0.2, 0.0)
                               green:MAX(g - 0.2, 0.0)
                                blue:MAX(b - 0.2, 0.0)
                               alpha:a];
    return nil;
}

Use it like this:

UIColor *baseColor = // however you obtain your color
UIColor *lighterColor = [self lighterColorForColor:baseColor];
UIColor *darkerColor = [self darkerColorForColor:baseColor];

EDIT: as @Anchu Chimala pointed out, for maximum flexibility, these methods should be implemented as an UIColor category. Also, from @Riley's idea, it may be a better idea to make the color proprtionally darker or lighter instead of adding or subtracting constant values. As @jrturton pointed out, it's not necessary to manipulate the RGB components; it's better to modify the brightness property itself. All in all:

@implementation UIColor (LightAndDark)

- (UIColor *)lighterColor
{
    CGFloat h, s, b, a;
    if ([self getHue:&h saturation:&s brightness:&b alpha:&a])
        return [UIColor colorWithHue:h
                          saturation:s
                          brightness:MIN(b * 1.3, 1.0)
                               alpha:a];
    return nil;
}

- (UIColor *)darkerColor
{
    CGFloat h, s, b, a;
    if ([self getHue:&h saturation:&s brightness:&b alpha:&a])
        return [UIColor colorWithHue:h
                          saturation:s
                          brightness:b * 0.75
                               alpha:a];
    return nil;
}
@end
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Why use RGB when you can do the same with hue,saturation, brightness, then just rebuild the colour with the brightness changed? –  jrturton Jul 22 '12 at 7:51
    
The APi should be [self getHue:&h saturation:&s brightness:&b alpha:&a]), you miss the alpha component. Thanks for your excellent answer. –  flypig Nov 8 '12 at 17:13
2  
I've been trying with the HSB version myself, and it didn't work as expected. Despite the getHue:saturation:brightness signature of UIKit, it seems it works with HSV instead of HSB. Changing the brightness (so in fact, the value) in this context will not work. For example pure Red (rgb(255,0,0)) will have a brightness/value of 1, thus making lightening through the brightness impossible. I ended up working with changes on RGB values instead. –  rchampourlier Jun 4 '13 at 10:01
2  
I think that there is something confusing in your answer: you take the two approaches (one with RGB, and the other with HSB for the category version), which don't have the same result... And that may be a question of meaning: lightening is indeed for me making the color tend to the white (darkening to the black), while changing the brightness/value is making it stronger (resp. lighter). –  rchampourlier Jun 4 '13 at 10:11
1  
This methods will fail if they are used on gray shades. getHue:saturation:brightness:alpha will return FALSE. –  Matthieu Riegler May 14 at 23:34

If you convert the RGB color to the HSL color model then you can vary the L = lightness component from L = 0.0 (black) over L = 0.5 (natural color) to L = 1.0 (white) . UIColor cannot handle HSL directly, but there are formula for converting RGB <-> HSL.

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Not HSL, but HSB is fine : developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/uikit/reference/…: –  jrturton Jul 22 '12 at 7:50
4  
The difference between the HSL and the HSB (sometimes also called HSV) color model is that in HSB L = 1.0 corresponds to the pure color, whereas in HSL L = 1.0 corresponds to white and L = 0.5 to the pure color. Since the original poster asked e.g. for a way to make the color blue (RGB=0/0/1) lighter, I think that HSL is more flexible. –  Martin R Jul 22 '12 at 8:03
    
I didn't know that. Thanks! –  jrturton Jul 22 '12 at 8:54

@rchampourlier was right in his comment to @user529758 (The accepted answer) - The HSB (Or HSV) and RGB solutions give completely different results. RGB just adds (Or makes the color closer to) white, and the HSB solution brings the color closer to the edge in the Brigtness scale - which basically start with black and ends with the pure color...

Basically Brightness (Value) makes the color less or more closer to black, where Saturation makes it less or more closer to white...

As seen here:

HSV color graph

So the solution to make a color actually brighter (i.e. closer to white...) will be to make it's Saturation value smaller, resulting this solution:

- (UIColor *)lighterColor {
    CGFloat h,s,b,a;
    if ([self getHue:&h saturation:&s brightness:&b alpha:&a]) {
        return [UIColor colorWithHue:h
                          saturation:MAX(s - 0.3, 0.0)
                          brightness:b /*MIN(b * 1.3, 1.0)*/
                               alpha:a];
    }
    return nil;
}

If you are looking for the copy&paste thingy to throw in your UIColor category, you might want this:

- (UIColor *)lighterColorRemoveSaturation:(CGFloat)removeS
                              resultAlpha:(CGFloat)alpha {
    CGFloat h,s,b,a;
    if ([self getHue:&h saturation:&s brightness:&b alpha:&a]) {
        return [UIColor colorWithHue:h
                          saturation:MAX(s - removeS, 0.0)
                          brightness:b
                               alpha:alpha == -1? a:alpha];
    }
    return nil;
}

- (UIColor *)lighterColor {
    return [self lighterColorRemoveSaturation:0.5
                                  resultAlpha:-1];
}
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I'm not sure if you're looking for some sort of Objective-C answer, but based on how colors specified by RGBA work, I think you can simply scale the RGB values according to an arbitrary factor to get a "lighter" or "darker" shade. For example, you might have a blue:

[UIColor colorWithRed:0.0 green:0.0 blue:1.0 alpha:1.0];

Want a darker blue? Multiply the RGB values by 0.9:

[UIColor colorWithRed:0.0 green:0.0 blue:0.9 alpha:1.0];

Voila. Or maybe you have an orange:

[UIColor colorWithRed:1.0 green:0.4 blue:0.0 alpha:1.0];

Choose another scale factor, say, 0.8:

[UIColor colorWithRed:0.8 green:0.32 blue:0.0 alpha:1.0];

Is that the sort of effect you're looking for?

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Ok Yeah that is half of what I need. Is there a way to get a lighter color then when blue is 1 (Max) –  CoreCode Jul 22 '12 at 6:12
    
@CoreCode no, not really. Unless you wish to change the birghtness of the device's screen :) See my answer. –  user529758 Jul 22 '12 at 6:13

If you want user529758's solution to work with gray shades (like [UIColor lightGrayColor] or [UIColor darkGrayColor] you have to improve it like that:

- (UIColor *)lighterColor
{
    CGFloat h, s, b, a;
    if ([self getHue:&h saturation:&s brightness:&b alpha:&a]) {
        return [UIColor colorWithHue:h
                          saturation:s
                          brightness:MIN(b * 1.3, 1.0)
                               alpha:a];
    }

    CGFloat white, alpha;
    if ([self getWhite:&white alpha:&alpha]) {
        white = MIN(1.3*white, 1.0);
        return [UIColor colorWithWhite:white alpha:alpha];
    }

    return nil;
}

getHue:saturation:brightness:alpha fails (and returns false) when called on a gray shade therefore you'll need to use getWhite:alpha.

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None of the solutions posted quite worked for all colours and shades, but then I stumbled across this library which provides a set of very well implemented extensions to UIColor.

Specifically it has a lighten function as part of its HSL implementation: (UIColor *)lighten:(CGFloat)amount - which works perfectly.

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user529758's solution in Swift:

Darker color:

func darkerColorForColor(color: UIColor) -> UIColor {

       var r:CGFloat = 0, g:CGFloat = 0, b:CGFloat = 0, a:CGFloat = 0

       if color.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a){
           return UIColor(red: max(r - 0.2, 0.0), green: max(g - 0.2, 0.0), blue: max(b - 0.2, 0.0), alpha: a)
       }

       return UIColor()
}

Lighter color:

func lighterColorForColor(color: UIColor) -> UIColor {

       var r:CGFloat = 0, g:CGFloat = 0, b:CGFloat = 0, a:CGFloat = 0

       if color.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a){
           return UIColor(red: min(r - 0.2, 0.0), green: min(g - 0.2, 0.0), blue: min(b - 0.2, 0.0), alpha: a)
       }

       return UIColor()
}
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