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I want to ask about how can I make fail over in for, like bellow:

 again = 1
 start = 1
 try:
   def countthis():
          for i in range (start,200):
              again = i
              print i
 except:
    print "Failure occured, I will try again" 
    start = again
    countthis.run()

I want if for function fails in i's try , it start it again from newest i (not from 1)

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Here you are wrapping the definition of countthis, but the definition is safe. –  tiwo Jul 22 '12 at 6:41
    
Stop using three different indentation lengths. See PEP 8. –  user1203803 Jul 22 '12 at 12:33
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2 Answers 2

You can use an iterator function like this:

def countthis(start=0, end=100):
    for i in range(start, end):
        print i
        if i == 5:
            raise Exception('5 failed')
        yield i

and then on error resume the counter using the next number, skipping the failed:

ret = 0
end = 100
while ret < end - 1:
    try:
        for i in countthis(start=ret, end=end):
            ret = i
    except Exception, ex:
        print ex
        # when 5 reached, an exception will be raised, so here we restart at '6'
        ret = ret + 2

This will finally print:

0
1
2
3
4
5
5 failed
6
7
......
99
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As I commented before, you probably want to wrap the calls in try..except, not the definition. Is this what you are looking for?

def f():
    print "f called: ",

    import random
    x = random.randint(0, 10) / 8

    print "1/x =", 1/x

while True:
    try:
        f()
        break
    except ZeroDivisionError:
        print "f failed"
        continue

Or, if you don't want to restart the whole function from 1, why not use try..except inside the functions definition:

def f():
    import random

    for i in range(1, 10):
        while True:
            try:
                print i,

                # do something with i:
                print 1 / (i // random.randint(0, 8))
                break
            except ZeroDivisionError:
                continue


f()
share|improve this answer
    
But note that while True means the loop will not terminate as long as the error persists - is this what you want? –  tiwo Jul 22 '12 at 6:59
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