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I want to split string according to delimiter but only outside parenthesis. Is there any library (built-in or not) that does so? Example: If delimiter is ":" then: string "a:b:c" should be split to "a","b","c" string "a(b:c):d" should be split to "a(b:c)","d"

Thanks

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3  
I've answered a similar question over here: - stackoverflow.com/questions/7804335/… – aioobe Jul 22 '12 at 7:42
1  
...and here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9656212/… – aioobe Jul 22 '12 at 7:49
    
so your answer is that it can't be done using regular expressions? Then how can it be done? I can parse it manually but prefer something that is ready and tested :) – duduamar Jul 22 '12 at 7:53
    
I'm saying it depends on how you want to for instance treat "a(b:(c:d)):e". In general, I would strongly advice you to use a parser generator. – aioobe Jul 22 '12 at 7:58
    
a nice spitter is that one provided by google guava libraries, you can check it out here: code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/… – JayZee Jul 22 '12 at 7:59

The other commenters are right that you are probably best off using a grammar library. If, however, this is a one off thing and you'd rather just deal with it quickly, this algorithm should handle it in a clear fashion, and will deal with nested parentheses. Note: I'm assuming your parentheses are well balanced, i.e., no right parentheses that don't have an opening left paren before them.

int parenDepth = 0;
int start = 0;
List<String> splits = new ArrayList<String>();

for(int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++)
{
    char ch = str.get(i);
    if(ch == '(')
         parenDepth++;
    else if(ch == ')')
         parenDepth--;
    else if(parenDepth == 0 && ch ==',')
    {
         if(start != i) // comment out this if if you want to allow empty strings in 
                        // the splits
             splits.add(str.substring(start, i));
         start = i+1;
    }
}

splits.add(str.substring(start));
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to add the last element, but seems like nice straight forward approach – duduamar Jul 22 '12 at 10:06
    
Oops, fixed it to add that one too. Thanks! – rmehlinger Jul 22 '12 at 17:52

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