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Well i am new to java and i have a problem implementing synchronized block of code in java threads.

class btstep extends Thread
{
    private static final Object lock = new Object();
    public void run()
    {
        synchronized(lock)
        {
            System.out.println("3 ");
            System.out.println("4 ");
        }
    }
}

class btevent extends Thread
{
    private static final Object locko = new Object();
    public void run()
    {
        synchronized(locko)
        {
            System.out.println("1 ");
            System.out.println("2 ");
        }
    }
}

public class Interleaving
{
    public static btevent bt = new btevent();
    public static btstep bs = new btstep();

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        bt.start();
        bs.start();
    }
}

The running output of this program is

1
3
2
4

which is not what i want. the synchronized block of code is not serial any more its interleaving what i want as an output is

1
2
3
4

or

3
4
1
2

What am i doing wrong in the program??

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4 Answers 4

You're using two different lock objects (lock and locko), so the blocks are not mutually exclusive. You need both blocks to synchronize on the same lock object to achieve what you want.

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You need to associate an object with the thing you want to synchronize (in this case, the output stream) and have every thread that accesses that thing do it through that object's synchronized methods. (Or locking that object explicitly.) –  David Schwartz Jul 22 '12 at 8:32
    
As an aside, I just cannot understand why locks can just be 'attached' to any object, instead of the developer raising an explicit 'lock' synchronization object. Is there some huge upside I cannot see? All I see is confusion and bugs, like this one. I guess that a pointer to hold a possible lock object is now overhead in every Java object? Who woke up one morning and shouted "Eureka - we'll make any object lockable!"? –  Martin James Jul 22 '12 at 9:07
    
@MartinJames: AFAIK, there is no additional pointer in every object to hold the lock. Intrinsic locks are what allow the synchronized blocks and methods (without any explicit lock passed) to exist and work. –  JB Nizet Jul 22 '12 at 9:24
    
@MartinJames: Most of the time, there is an object that represents the thing you want to lock. So it makes the common case a bit simpler. However, I do agree that it can make people think that locking isn't something they really have to think too hard about because "it's already in there" and "it just works without me having to do anything but put a keyword in there" and that can lead to mistakes like this one. –  David Schwartz Jul 22 '12 at 10:37

Both threads need to share the same lock object instance, only then you will be able to achieve the output you desire.

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When you synchronize, the choice of object is every important. If you want two threads to interact, they must synchronize on the same object.

The simplest solution is to use

synchronized(System.out) {

to synchronize your output.

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2  
Do you really recommend to lock on a global (that any other component might choose to synchronize unrelated things), and mutable field? I wouldn't do that. –  JB Nizet Jul 22 '12 at 8:17
    
It demonstrates the intent to synchroize the output. I would do what the OP suggest because it would be much simpler with a single thread. You are right that locking mutable and global objects is bad idea, but in this case its the simplest solution. (Apart from not use threads at all) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 22 '12 at 8:38

To synchronize 2 (or more) code blocks, they must be synchronized on the same object. In your case, objects are different.

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