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I was starting on JAVA web development today and encountered some problems, I installed my tomcat7 on my ubuntu machine. Now when I browse to //localhost:8080, I get the default welcome page saying:

This is the default Tomcat home page. It can be found on the local filesystem at: /var/lib/tomcat7/webapps/ROOT/index.html

Tomcat7 veterans might be pleased to learn that this system instance of Tomcat is installed with CATALINA_HOME in /usr/share/tomcat7 and CATALINA_BASE in /var/lib/tomcat7, following the rules from /usr/share/doc/tomcat7-common/RUNNING.txt.gz.

But strangely when I try echo $CATALINA_HOME nothing shows up. Also I can not copy/create anything in the default /var/lib/tomcat7/ROOT though it's just a matter of providing few permissions but I was wondering whether it is the right way to do it?,

What I would like to do is create a separate directory in my home where I can put my web application and tomcat can read hem from there. Is there a way to do it? In apache I can do it by changing the document-root and directory but I don't know how to do it for tomcat

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Have you check your .bashrc if CATALINA_HOME is defined? –  Joseph Elcid Jul 22 '12 at 10:39
2  
If you installed tomcat using apt-get, you might consider removing it and using the standalone version of tomcat, which you could extract into your $HOME directory or somewhere else convenient. –  Rob Hruska Jul 22 '12 at 10:43
    
Why do you want to copy anything to the ROOT folder? to deploy an application just copy it to the webapps folder, or use Tomcat manager. –  fatman Jul 22 '12 at 12:40
    
@RobHruska: I don't want to do it , as it would mess up my eclipse configurations (which is alreazdy kind of messed up)..is there no other way? –  Sudh Jul 23 '12 at 18:35
1  
Linux distros have a long track record of goofing up things like Tomcat. In any case, I see no programming question here, try serverfault? –  bmargulies Jul 23 '12 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

But strangely when I try echo $CATALINA_HOME nothing shows up.

If you installed tomcat7 by using this command

sudo apt-get install tomcat7

/usr/share/tomcat7 is your CATALINA_HOME though, you need to add this as an environment variable in the /.bashrc file.

sudo vi ~/.bashrc

You can add this information to the end of the file:

export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java
export CATALINA_HOME=/usr/share/tomcat7

Save and exit out of .bashrc. You can make the changes effective by restarting the bashrc file.

. ~/.bashrc

Now, you would see the path when echo $CATALINA_HOME.

Reference

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But strangely when I try echo $CATALINA_HOME nothing shows up.

This is because the packaged version sets CATALINA_HOME just prior to launching Tomcat, after reading it from a configuration file (typically somewhere in /etc).

Also I can not copy/create anything in the default /var/lib/tomcat7/ROOT though it's just a matter of providing few permissions but I was wondering whether it is the right way to do it?

The permissions problem has to do with you not being root (or the Tomcat user). Most packaged Tomcat installations (deb or RPM) tend to install with a specific user in mind, and copying stuff in as a different sometimes won't work.

/usr/share/tomcat7 is your CATALINA_HOME directory, and it has links to the other directories, such as /var/lib/tomcat7/webapps, /etc/tomcat7, etc. You shouldn't copy directly into a web application, you should package the web application into a WAR file and "deploy" it. The advantages are numerous.

What I would like to do is create a separate directory in my home where I can put my web application and tomcat can read hem from there. Is there a way to do it?

Yes, one is created when "deploying a web app". Look to the standard Tomcat7 documentation, and consider installing the "manager" web application if you like a non-command line interface. Now that you know what "installation" of a web app is called, it will likely be an easier task.

In apache I can do it by changing the document-root and directory but I don't know how to do it for tomcat

Tomcat has a different, slightly more restrictive set of requirements for a document-root. You need to learn it, and just come to terms with the idea that it's never going to be the same. Basically under the "webapps" directory, is a WAR file or a expanded directory that came from a WAR file. Editing in-place is not a good idea for Tomcat, as the CGI-equivalents are not read from disk each time they are ran, they are linked into the memory of Tomcat. This means that a change in the directory might not affect your web application, which is good enough reason to not bother changing the on-disk files for a deployed web application.

Modify the web application, repackage it, and update the deployment. It's really the "right" way to go with Tomcat.

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Thanks for the details..meanwhile I removed tomcat, downloaded a tar and unziped into my home folder, after adding few symbolic links I am able to patch it up even with eclipse also... it runs perfectly fine from there (At least till now)....Do you think I might run into some issues later?...or why this is not the right way to do it? –  Sudh Jul 26 '12 at 15:13
    
The kinds of issues you will run into will be the kinds of issues that concern IT administration, not the kinds of issues that concern developers. Basically, logging isn't integrated with the rest of the OS, startup / shutdown isn't integrated with the OS, configuration files are not where the OS stores config files, binaries are not default-reachable by the OS, there is no dedicated user to limit OS scope, libraries are not integrated with OS libraries, and the temporary space is not inside the temporary space reserved by the OS. Your setup is fine for development, just don't deploy that way –  Edwin Buck Jul 26 '12 at 15:18

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