Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the following code :

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int pipefd[2];
    pid_t cpid;
    char buf;

    if (argc != 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s \n", argv[0]);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    if (pipe(pipefd) == -1) {
        perror("pipe");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    cpid = fork();
    if (cpid == -1) {
        perror("fork");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    if (cpid == 0) {    /* Child reads from pipe */
        close(pipefd[1]);          /* Close unused write end */

        while (read(pipefd[0], &buf, 1) > 0)
            write(STDOUT_FILENO, &buf, 1);

        write(STDOUT_FILENO, "\n", 1);
        close(pipefd[0]);
        _exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);

    } else {            /* Parent writes argv[1] to pipe */
        close(pipefd[0]);          /* Close unused read end */
        write(pipefd[1], argv[1], strlen(argv[1]));
        close(pipefd[1]);          /* Reader will see EOF */
        wait(NULL);                /* Wait for child */
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
return 0;

}

Whenever the son process wants to read from the pipe , he must first close the pipe's side from writing . When I remove that line close(pipefd[1]); from the child's process IF , I'm basically saying that , okay , the son can read from the pipe , but I'm allowing the father to write to the pipe at the same time ?

If so , what would happen when the pipe is open for both reading & writing ? no mutual exclusion ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Read() and write() to a pipe are guaranteed to be atomic. (upto PIPE_BUFF size). That means: first come, first served. The Written/read parts will be interlaced, but their boundaries are still intact. –  wildplasser Jul 22 '12 at 10:30
2  
If you don't close the child's write end of the pipe, the child will never see an EOF, since EOF will only appear when the write end has been closed by all its users. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7868018/… for an example. –  ninjalj Jul 22 '12 at 13:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Whenever the son process wants to read from the pipe, he must first close the pipe's side from writing.

If the process — parent or child — is not going to use the write end of a pipe, it should close that file descriptor. Similarly for the read end of a pipe. The system will assume that a write could occur while any process has the write end open, even if the only such process is the one that is currently trying to read from the pipe, and the system will not report EOF, therefore. Further, if you overfill a pipe and there is still a process with the read end open (even if that process is the one trying to write), then the write will hang, waiting for the reader to make space for the write to complete.

When I remove that line close(pipefd[1]); from the child's process IF, I'm basically saying that, okay, the son can read from the pipe, but I'm allowing the father to write to the pipe at the same time?

No; you're saying that the child can write to the pipe as well as the parent. Any process with the write file descriptor for the pipe can write to the pipe.

If so, what would happen when the pipe is open for both reading and writing — no mutual exclusion?

There isn't any mutual exclusion ever. Any process with the pipe write descriptor open can write to the pipe at any time; the kernel ensures that two concurrent write operations are in fact serialized. Any process with the pipe read descriptor open can read from the pipe at any time; the kernel ensures that two concurrent read operations get different data bytes.

You make sure a pipe is used unidirectionally by ensuring that only one process has it open for writing and only one process has it open for reading. However, that is a programming decision. You could have N processes with the write end open and M processes with the read end open (and, perish the thought, there could be processes in common between the set of N and set of M processes), and they'd all be able to work surprisingly sanely. But you'd not readily be able to predict where a packet of data would be read after it was written.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer ! +100 if I could ! –  ron Jul 25 '12 at 9:35

fork() duplicates the file handles, so you will have two handles for each end of the pipe.

Now, consider this. If the parent doesn't close the unused end of the pipe, there will still be two handles for it. If the child dies, the handle on the child side goes away, but there's still the open handle held by the parent -- thus, there will never be a "broken pipe" or "EOF" arriving because the pipe is still perfectly valid. There's just nobody putting data into it anymore.

Same for the other direction, of course.

Yes, the parent/child could still use the handle to write into their own pipe; I don't remember a use-case for this, though, and it still gives you synchronization problems.

share|improve this answer

When the pipe is created it is having two ends the read end and write end. These are entries in the User File descriptor table.

Similarly there will be two entries in the File table with 1 as reference count for both the read end and the write end.

Now when you fork, a child is created that is the file descriptors are duplicated and thus the reference count of both the ends in the file table becomes 2.

Now "When I remove that line close(pipefd[1])" -> In this case even if the parent has completed writing, your while loop below this line will block for ever for the read to return 0(ie EOF). This happens since even if the parent has completed writing and closed the write end of the pipe, the reference count of the write end in the File table is still 1 (Initially it was 2) and so the read function still is waiting for some data to arrive which will never happen.

Now if you have not written "close(pipefd[0]);" in the parent, this current code may not show any problem, since you are writing once in the parent.

But if you write more than once then ideally you would have wanted to get an error (if the child is no longer reading),but since the read end in the parent is not closed, you will not be getting the error (Even if the child is no more there to read).

So the problem of not closing the unused ends become evident when we are continuously reading/writing data. This may not be evident if we are just reading/writing data once.

Like if instead of the read loop in the child, you are using only once the line below, where you are getting all the data in one go, and not caring to check for EOF, your program will work even if you are not writing "close(pipefd[1]);" in the child.

read(pipefd[0], buf, sizeof(buf));//buf is a character array sufficiently large  
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful about the distinction between open file descriptions and open file descriptors. It's really hard work being precise. The count is in the open file description, not in the descriptor. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 22 '12 at 15:10
    
@JonathanLeffler Thanks Jonathan. "File Table Entries" which I have mentioned in the answer and "open file descriptions" hope they refer to the same thing. –  Tanmoy Jul 22 '12 at 17:03

man page for pipe() for SunOS :- Read calls on an empty pipe (no buffered data) with only one end (all write file descriptors closed) return an EOF (end of file).

 A SIGPIPE signal is generated if a write on a pipe with only
 one end is attempted.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.