Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using CCNET on a sample project with SVN as my source control. CCNET is configured to create a build on every check in. CCNET uses MSBuild to build the source code.

I would like to use the latest revision number to generate AssemblyInfo.cs while compiling. How can I retrieve the latest revision from subversion and use the value in CCNET?

Edit: I'm not using NAnt - only MSBuild.

share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

up vote 41 down vote accepted

CruiseControl.Net 1.4.4 has now an Assembly Version Labeller, which generates version numbers compatible with .Net assembly properties.

In my project I have it configured as:

<labeller type="assemblyVersionLabeller" incrementOnFailure="true" major="1" minor="2"/>

(Caveat: assemblyVersionLabeller won't start generating svn revision based labels until an actual commit-triggered build occurs.)

and then consume this from my MSBuild projects with MSBuildCommunityTasks.AssemblyInfo :

<Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\MSBuildCommunityTasks\MSBuild.Community.Tasks.Targets"/>
<Target Name="BeforeBuild">
  <AssemblyInfo Condition="'$(CCNetLabel)' != ''" CodeLanguage="CS" OutputFile="Properties\AssemblyInfo.cs" 
  AssemblyTitle="MyTitle" AssemblyCompany="MyCompany" AssemblyProduct="MyProduct"
  AssemblyCopyright="Copyright ©  2009" ComVisible="false" Guid="some-random-guid"
  AssemblyVersion="$(CCNetLabel)" AssemblyFileVersion="$(CCNetLabel)"/>
</Target>

For sake of completness, it's just as easy for projects using NAnt instead of MSBuild:

<target name="setversion" description="Sets the version number to CruiseControl.Net label.">
    <script language="C#">
        <references>
            <include name="System.dll" />
        </references>
        <imports>
            <import namespace="System.Text.RegularExpressions" />
        </imports>
        <code><![CDATA[
             [TaskName("setversion-task")]
             public class SetVersionTask : Task
             {
              protected override void ExecuteTask()
              {
               StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(Project.Properties["filename"]);
               string contents = reader.ReadToEnd();
               reader.Close();
               string replacement = "[assembly: AssemblyVersion(\"" + Project.Properties["CCNetLabel"] + "\")]";
               string newText = Regex.Replace(contents, @"\[assembly: AssemblyVersion\("".*""\)\]", replacement);
               StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(Project.Properties["filename"], false);
               writer.Write(newText);
               writer.Close();
              }
             }
             ]]>
        </code>
    </script>
    <foreach item="File" property="filename">
        <in>
            <items basedir="..">
                <include name="**\AssemblyInfo.cs"></include>
            </items>
        </in>
        <do>
            <setversion-task />
        </do>
    </foreach>
</target>
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Awesome, this helped me a lot. I updated your version for NAnt to also update the AssemblyFileVersion and some minor things. It's included as another answer here in this thread. Thanks! –  galaktor Sep 12 '09 at 10:02
    
Others should not discount that caveat; it is very important. As a result, there are a lot of answers out on the webs saying that this doesn't work. Still seems buggy, but trigger that build on a check in once and everything works as expected there after. -- Thanks a bunch –  Chuck May 10 '12 at 18:58

You have basically two options. Either you write a simple script that will start and parse output from

svn.exe info --revision HEAD

to obtain revision number (then generating AssemblyInfo.cs is pretty much straight forward) or just use plugin for CCNET. Here it is:

SVN Revision Labeller is a plugin for CruiseControl.NET that allows you to generate CruiseControl labels for your builds, based upon the revision number of your Subversion working copy. This can be customised with a prefix and/or major/minor version numbers.

http://code.google.com/p/svnrevisionlabeller/

I prefer the first option because it's only roughly 20 lines of code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace SvnRevisionNumberParserSample
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Process p = Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo()
                {
                    FileName = @"C:\Program Files\SlikSvn\bin\svn.exe", // path to your svn.exe
                    UseShellExecute = false,
                    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                    Arguments = "info --revision HEAD",
                    WorkingDirectory = @"C:\MyProject" // path to your svn working copy
                });
            // command "svn.exe info --revision HEAD" will produce a few lines of output
            p.WaitForExit();

            // our line starts with "Revision: "
            while (!p.StandardOutput.EndOfStream)
            {
                string line = p.StandardOutput.ReadLine();
                if (line.StartsWith("Revision: "))
                {
                    string revision = line.Substring("Revision: ".Length);
                    Console.WriteLine(revision); // show revision number on screen                       
                    break;
                }
            }
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Still going to post that sample? :P –  Simucal Feb 3 '09 at 1:32
    
@lubos hasko, thanks mate. –  Simucal Feb 3 '09 at 4:08

I have written a NAnt build file that handles parsing SVN information and creating properties. I then use those property values for a variety of build tasks, including setting the label on the build. I use this target combined with the SVN Revision Labeller mentioned by lubos hasko with great results.

<target name="svninfo" description="get the svn checkout information">
<property name="svn.infotempfile" value="${build.directory}\svninfo.txt" />
<exec program="${svn.executable}" output="${svn.infotempfile}">
<arg value="info" />
</exec>
<loadfile file="${svn.infotempfile}" property="svn.info" />
<delete file="${svn.infotempfile}" />

<property name="match" value="" />

<regex pattern="URL: (?'match'.*)" input="${svn.info}" />
<property name="svn.info.url" value="${match}"/>

<regex pattern="Repository Root: (?'match'.*)" input="${svn.info}" />
<property name="svn.info.repositoryroot" value="${match}"/>

<regex pattern="Revision: (?'match'\d+)" input="${svn.info}" />
<property name="svn.info.revision" value="${match}"/>

<regex pattern="Last Changed Author: (?'match'\w+)" input="${svn.info}" />
<property name="svn.info.lastchangedauthor" value="${match}"/>

<echo message="URL: ${svn.info.url}" />
<echo message="Repository Root: ${svn.info.repositoryroot}" />
<echo message="Revision: ${svn.info.revision}" />
<echo message="Last Changed Author: ${svn.info.lastchangedauthor}" />
</target>
share|improve this answer

I found this project on google code. This is CCNET plugin to generate the label in CCNET.

The DLL is tested with CCNET 1.3 but it works with CCNET 1.4 for me. I'm successfully using this plugin to label my build.

Now onto passing it to MSBuild...

share|improve this answer

If you prefer doing it on the MSBuild side over the CCNet config, looks like the MSBuild Community Tasks extension's SvnVersion task might do the trick.

share|improve this answer

I am currently "manually" doing it through a prebuild-exec Task, using my cmdnetsvnrev tool, but if someone knows a better ccnet-integrated way of doing it, i'd be happy to hear :-)

share|improve this answer

Customizing csproj files to autogenerate AssemblyInfo.cs
http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/Customizing_csproj_files.aspx

Every time we create a new C# project, Visual Studio puts there the AssemblyInfo.cs file for us. The file defines the assembly meta-data like its version, configuration, or producer.

Found the above technique to auto-gen AssemblyInfo.cs using MSBuild. Will post sample shortly.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if this work with CCNET or not, but I've created an SVN version plug-in for the Build Version Increment project on CodePlex. This tool is pretty flexible and can be set to automatically create a version number for you using the svn revision. It doesn't require writing any code or editing xml, so yay!

I hope this is helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting plug-ins. Will surely give them a try soon. Thanks! –  hitec Apr 12 '10 at 8:46

My approach is to use the aforementioned plugin for ccnet and a nant echo task to generate a VersionInfo.cs file containing nothing but the version attributes. I only have to include the VersionInfo.cs file into the build

The echo task simply outputs the string I give it to a file.

If there is a similar MSBuild task, you can use the same approach. Here's the small nant task I use:

<target name="version" description="outputs version number to VersionInfo.cs">
  <echo file="${projectdir}/Properties/VersionInfo.cs">
    [assembly: System.Reflection.AssemblyVersion("$(CCNetLabel)")]
    [assembly: System.Reflection.AssemblyFileVersion("$(CCNetLabel)")]
  </echo>
</target>

Try this:

<ItemGroup>
    <VersionInfoFile Include="VersionInfo.cs"/>
    <VersionAttributes>
        [assembly: System.Reflection.AssemblyVersion("${CCNetLabel}")]
        [assembly: System.Reflection.AssemblyFileVersion("${CCNetLabel}")]
    </VersionAttributes>
</ItemGroup>
<Target Name="WriteToFile">
    <WriteLinesToFile
        File="@(VersionInfoFile)"
        Lines="@(VersionAttributes)"
        Overwrite="true"/>
</Target>

Please note that I'm not very intimate with MSBuild, so my script will probably not work out-of-the-box and need corrections...

share|improve this answer

Be careful. The structure used for build numbers is only a short so you have a ceiling on how high your revision can go.

In our case, we've already exceeded the limit.

If you attempt to put in the build number 99.99.99.599999, the file version property will actually come out as 99.99.99.10175.

share|improve this answer
    
is it not the case that System.Version specifies .Revision which is an int32 and so you can read that out rather than Minor and Major which are a masked Int32 cast to a short. –  krystan honour Mar 16 '10 at 9:39

Based on skolimas solution I updated the NAnt script to also update the AssemblyFileVersion. Thanks to skolima for the code!

<target name="setversion" description="Sets the version number to current label.">
    	<script language="C#">
    		<references>
    				<include name="System.dll" />
    		</references>
    		<imports>
    				<import namespace="System.Text.RegularExpressions" />
    		</imports>
    		<code><![CDATA[
    				 [TaskName("setversion-task")]
    				 public class SetVersionTask : Task
    				 {
    				  protected override void ExecuteTask()
    				  {
    				   StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(Project.Properties["filename"]);
    				   string contents = reader.ReadToEnd();
    				   reader.Close();					   
    				   // replace assembly version
    				   string replacement = "[assembly: AssemblyVersion(\"" + Project.Properties["label"] + "\")]";
    				   contents = Regex.Replace(contents, @"\[assembly: AssemblyVersion\("".*""\)\]", replacement);					   					   
    				   // replace assembly file version
    				   replacement = "[assembly: AssemblyFileVersion(\"" + Project.Properties["label"] + "\")]";
    				   contents = Regex.Replace(contents, @"\[assembly: AssemblyFileVersion\("".*""\)\]", replacement);					   					   
    				   StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(Project.Properties["filename"], false);
    				   writer.Write(contents);
    				   writer.Close();
    				  }
    				 }
    				 ]]>
    		</code>
    	</script>
    	<foreach item="File" property="filename">
    		<in>
    				<items basedir="${srcDir}">
    						<include name="**\AssemblyInfo.cs"></include>
    				</items>
    		</in>
    		<do>
    				<setversion-task />
    		</do>
    	</foreach>
    </target>
share|improve this answer

No idea where I found this. But I found this on the internet "somewhere".

This updates all the AssemblyInfo.cs files before the build takes place.

Works like a charm. All my exe's and dll's show up as 1.2.3.333 (If "333" were the SVN revision at the time.) (And the original version in the AssemblyInfo.cs file was listed as "1.2.3.0")


$(ProjectDir) (Where my .sln file resides)

$(SVNToolPath) (points to svn.exe)

are my custom variables, their declarations/definitions are not defined below.


http://msbuildtasks.tigris.org/ and/or https://github.com/loresoft/msbuildtasks has the ( FileUpdate and SvnVersion ) tasks.


  <Target Name="SubVersionBeforeBuildVersionTagItUp">

    <ItemGroup>
      <AssemblyInfoFiles Include="$(ProjectDir)\**\*AssemblyInfo.cs" />
    </ItemGroup>

    <SvnVersion LocalPath="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)" ToolPath="$(SVNToolPath)">
      <Output TaskParameter="Revision" PropertyName="MySubVersionRevision" />
    </SvnVersion>

    <FileUpdate Files="@(AssemblyInfoFiles)"
            Regex="(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)"
            ReplacementText="$1.$2.$3.$(MySubVersionRevision)" />
  </Target>

EDIT --------------------------------------------------

The above may start failing after your SVN revision number reaches 65534 or higher.

See:

Turn off warning CS1607

Here is the workaround.

<FileUpdate Files="@(AssemblyInfoFiles)"
Regex="AssemblyFileVersion\(&quot;(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)"
ReplacementText="AssemblyFileVersion(&quot;$1.$2.$3.$(SubVersionRevision)" />

The result of this should be:

In Windows/Explorer//File/Properties…….

Assembly Version will be 1.0.0.0.

File Version will be 1.0.0.333 if 333 is the SVN revision.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I found the original place I found it : geekswithblogs.net/mnf/archive/2009/07/03/… –  granadaCoder Oct 10 '12 at 18:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.