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In a && b , this returns true if both a and b are equal to 1. If a=-1 and b=-1 then also the expression returns true.Similar is the case with a||b,where a=-1 and b=0,it returns true. Can anybody please explain the reason.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

a && b returns 1 when both a and b are nonzero, not just when they're equal to 1. Otherwise it returns 0.

a || b returns 1 when at least one of a or b is nonzero, not just when one of them is equal to 1. Otherwise it returns 0.

To give some examples:

   0 &&  0 -> 0
   1 &&  0 -> 0
   1 &&  1 -> 1
   2 &&  1 -> 1
  -1 && -1 -> 1
-100 &&  0 -> 0

   0 ||  0 -> 0
   1 ||  0 -> 1
   0 ||  1 -> 1
  -1 ||  0 -> 1
-100 || 20 -> 1
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Thanks nightcracker ,I really had a very big misconception :) –  sourabh912 Jul 22 '12 at 12:15
    
@sourabh912: if my answer solved your problem you can mark it as the answer by clicking the green tickbox to the left of my question. –  orlp Jul 22 '12 at 12:18
    
I may be wrong, but doesn't "when either a or b are nonzero" mean "one and only one of them is nonzero"? If you write "when at least one of a and b is nonzero", the difficulty of the precise meaning of "either" is circumvented. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 22 '12 at 16:08
    
@DanielFischer: changed wording. –  orlp Jul 22 '12 at 20:41

C11 (n1570) §6.5.13 al 3 p 99 say :

The && operator shall yield 1 if both of its operands compare unequal to 0; otherwise, it yields 0.

-1 is a nonzero value, so -1 && -1 is 1.

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On the MSDN page for &&:

The logical-AND operator produces the value 1 if both operands have nonzero values.

Clearly both operands are -1 in your example so they will produce 1.

On the same page, listed for ||

If either operand has a nonzero value, the result is 1.

In your case one operand is -1, therefore the result is 1

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Please don't refer to MSDN. –  orlp Jul 22 '12 at 12:06
    
@nightcracker what SHOULD I refer to? Every reference is ultimately a derrivitave of the spec. Why shouldnt't I chose MSDN over any other reference? –  Doug T. Jul 22 '12 at 12:07
1  
Because this behaviour is specified (not implementation-dependant) by the C specification, and MSVC has no choice on implementing this. Refer to the C99 or C11 spec instead. –  orlp Jul 22 '12 at 12:08
    
@nightcracker: Since they have to be the same, what difference does it make? –  David Schwartz Jul 22 '12 at 12:10
    
@DavidSchwartz: because this question is tagged c, not msvc. –  orlp Jul 22 '12 at 12:11

AND returns 1 if both operands have non-zero values. OR returns 1 if either operand has a non-zero value.

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Logical operators return either 0 or 1. The && operator returns 1 if both its operands are not 0.Else,it return 0. statements like if(x),while(x) etc.. get executed if its argument is not 0.For all other +ve and -ve arguments it get executed.

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