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I have been through a set of few surprises when it comes to Queue implementation for a Multithreading system. Here is:-

The Scenario:- 1 producer, 1 consumer:- A producer puts an integer into a queue. A consumer simply removes it from the queue.

The underlying data structure of the queue:- TreeSet (which I never thought I will use), LinkedList, LinkedBlockingQueue(with indefinite size)

The code:- of TreeSet as a queue:-

while (i < 2000000) {
        synchronized (objQueue) {

            if (!(objQueue.size() > 0)) {
                try {
                    objQueue.wait();
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            Integer x = objQueue.first();
            if (x != null) {
                objQueue.remove(x);
                ++i;
            }
        }
    }

EDIT:-

      while (i < 2000000) {
        synchronized (objQueue) {
            objQueue.add(i);
            ++i;
            objQueue.notify();
        }
    }

For LinkedBlockingQueue:-

     while (i < 2000000){
        try {
            objQueue.put(i);
            ++i;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
        }
    }

      while (i < 2000000) {
        try {
            objQueue.take();
            ++i;

        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
        }
    }

For LinkedList :- similar code with synchronized.

The Questions:-

1) When I measured the performance via Visual VM, I observed that the for the producer code, TreeSet performs better than LinkedBlockingQueue and LinkedList, even though it takes O(log n) time, the creation of objects in Linked structures is a significant overhead. Why is the theory quite different to the practice ? Why do we prefer Linked, Array structures over Tree structures in queue implementations ?

2) The synchronized comes out as a clear winner vs the ReeentrantLock because TreeSet performed better than LinkedList which performed better than LinkedBlockingQueue. I wish I could attach the Visual VM results. It is not in votes with the article, http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp10264/index.html

The operations are performed on

Dell Vostro 1015, core 2 duo 2.10, 2GB Ram with 32 bit operating system and with

JVM: Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (20.1-b02, mixed mode) Java: version 1.6.0_26, vendor Sun Microsystems Inc.

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2 Answers 2

  1. Because your benchmark is flawed: in a real use-case, the time taken to produce and consume elements from the queue is much more important than the time it takes to add and remove an element to/from the queue. So the raw performance of the queue is not so important. BTW, the code only shows how you take elements from the first queue implementation, and not how you add them. Moreover, the choice of the appropriate structure is not made based on performance, but on behavior. If you want something concurrent, you choose a blocking queue, because it's implemented for you and doesn't have bugs like your code has. If you want FIFO (which is often what you want), you won't choose a TreeSet.

  2. If you want to compare synchronized vs. ReentrantLock, you shouldn't use one data structure for one, and another data structure for the other. ReentrantLock used to be faster, but they are on the same level, nowadays (if I believe what Brian Goetz says in JCIP). Anyway, I would choose one over the other for safety/capability reasons. Not for performance reasons.

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I disagree that the decision criteria should not consider performance. A typical approach would be to get solution working correctly, then consider the performance. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with considering it before-hand, as it can possibly help save time-consuming refactoring later. –  Brady Jul 22 '12 at 13:39
    
@JB Nizet:- What bug does my code contain ? I have the similar understanding that for FIFO, I shouldn't use a TreeSet, but tell me the reason if the put method of TreeSet is much faster than the add method of a LinkedList(because the object construction time is high), why wouldn't I use a TreeSet (although the removal is very fast in case of a LinkedList)? For the real time trading applications, only performance matters. So the crux of the story is that I want to use a better DS for Queue and I want to use REL over synchronized. –  100pipers Jul 22 '12 at 14:01
1  
@Brady Sure, don't start out with a stupid design that will obviously perform badly, but you shouldn't choose a specific implementation based on a performance hunch. Choose the one that best fits your application's needs and you'll have way less bugs. If and only if performance becomes a problem, look for ways to improve it through swapping out implementations. –  Bohemian Jul 22 '12 at 14:04
    
For example, the wait() calls are not done in a loop checking for the wakeup condition, as the javadoc tells to do. It's thus vulnerable to spurious wakeups. It also ignore interrupts completely, which could simply prevent the program to end. –  JB Nizet Jul 22 '12 at 14:05
    
@gagansab Don't confuse liveliness and response time with insert/removal performance. –  Bohemian Jul 22 '12 at 14:06

1. ReentrantLock might be more apt to use if you need to implement a thread that traverses a linked list, locking the next node and then unlocking the current node.

2. Synchronized keyword is apt in situation such as lock coarsening, provides adaptive spinning,biased locking and the potential for lock elision via escape analysis. Those optimizations aren't currently implemented for ReentrantLock.

For a proper performance comparison see this:

http://lycog.com/concurency/performance-reentrantlock-synchronized/

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It's almost the same example for which I attached a link in my question. It does tell me that the performance of REL is better than synchronized starting with 2 threads. Also I feel that if I get a way to force the OS scheduler to run the threads on all the available CPUs, we will definitely get a better performance for LinkedBlockingQueues. If you need my observation data do let me know . –  100pipers Jul 22 '12 at 13:55
    
Kumar forgot to mention that he took his answer from David Dice's Weblog. –  Alexander Ryzhov Jun 17 '13 at 5:46
    
@AlexanderRyzhov thanks for letting me point to the original author of this article, as i read this while i was preparing for my scjp from so other blog...thank you very much –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Jun 17 '13 at 5:55
1  
The linked article has a huge bug - his reentrant lock examples aren't actually locking. –  Carl Summers Mar 25 at 16:54

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