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Im trying to write a function named ComputeMaximum that has two parameters, both of type pointer to constant double, and returns type pointer to double

I keep getting the following casting errors:

  1. invalid conversion from ‘const double*’ to ‘double*’
  2. cannot convert ‘double’ to ‘const double*’ for argument ‘1’ to ‘double* ComputeMaximum(const double*, const double*)’
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

double *ComputeMaximum(\2)
{
}

int main()
{
    double *max;


    return 0;
}
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1) You are trying to convert const pointers to non-const (bad!), 2) you are comparing pointer values instead of the values they point to. –  tenfour Jul 22 '12 at 13:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if he actually wants to pass pointers and return a pointer (can't think why unless this is homework) If you want const double you will need to put const before every use of the word double in this entire clip

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

double *ComputeMaximum(double *num1,double *num2)
{
    return (* num1 > * num2 ?num1:num2);  // need to dereference the comparison
}

int main()
{
    double *max;
    double a = 6.4;
    double b = 6.9; // need to be variables with real adresses, literals won't work

    max = ComputeMaximum(&a, &b); // pass pointers to a and b
    cout << *max;

    return 0;
}
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THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!! –  blitzeus Jul 22 '12 at 14:15

6.4, 6.9 are floating point literals (or) constant values and cannot be converted to pointers. What you need is just double as the parameter type for the function but not double*.

Pointers points to the address of the location and cannot hold value itself. So, try

double ComputeMaximum(const double num1, const double num2)
// Notice * are removed.
{
   // ....
}
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couldnt he say double a = 6.4; double b = 6.9; max = ComputeMaximum(&a, &b);? –  Hunter McMillen Jul 22 '12 at 13:48
    
Yes, then its correct. But in the return statement OP has to compare the values pointers are pointing to rather than pointers it self. –  Mahesh Jul 22 '12 at 13:48
    
what if ComputeMaximum must contain only one statement and must use no literal values, ifs, switches, loops, functions, variables other than its two formal parameters, additions, subtractions, multiplications, or divisions. –  blitzeus Jul 22 '12 at 14:03
    
You mean you want to use single return statement and compute all the four operations on the parameters passed. Right ? –  Mahesh Jul 22 '12 at 14:08

you have an invalid param, and the compiler won't allow this kind of implicit conversion:

max = ComputeMaximum(6.4, 6.9);

Since the header file is:

double *ComputeMaximum(const double *num1, const double *num2)

You either pass a const double * as argument, or change your declaration to:

double *ComputeMaximum(const double num1, const double num2)
double *ComputeMaximum(const double &num1, const double &num2)

However, this is valid for your case:

double a = 6.4;
double b = 6.9;
max = ComputeMaximum(&a, &b);

You can either explicit cast the value, or change the declaration in your method, or use references, if you want efficiency:

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Alternative to Mahesh's nice solution you can store the doubles in variables before calling the ComputeMaximum function then use the addressof operator & to return their location in memory.

double a = 6.4; 
double b = 6.9; 

max = ComputeMaximum(&a, &b);

But then you would also have to change your function to compare the values pointed to instead of the pointers themselves:

double *ComputeMaximum(const double *num1, const double *num2)
{
    double a = *(num1);
    double b = *(num2);

    return (double*)(a > b ? a : b);  
}
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You can also use const_cast to cast const values to non const values, but this is almost always a bad idea. The only legitimate use is interfacing with legacy libraries that expect strings as non const char pointers but don't actually modify them.

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