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I was just trying to test if I installed a new ide correctly and tried to compile this basic program, both in the IDE and with gedit and GCC and it would compile, but crash after I launch the executable in the command line - I have no idea what's wrong, as I'm still fairly new to pointers in C and it takes a while to wrap your head around the theory, according to most people.

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

    char print_func(char *hi);

    int main(void) {
        char *hi = "Hello, World!";
        print_func(*hi);
    }

    char print_func(char *hi) {
        printf("%d \n", *hi);
    }

I tried this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char print_func(char *hi);

int main(void) {
    char *hi = "Hello, World!";
    print_func(&hi);
}

char print_func(char *hi) {
    printf("%d \n", *hi);
}

and it outputs 44 with no crash.

share|improve this question
2  
Prefer to run GCC in -pedantic mode, or at least in -Wall mode. Both versions of your code are broken: they contain glaring errors, which will be detected by the compiler and accompanied by diagnostic messages. In fact, I'm getting diagnostic messages for this code from GCC even in default mode. Why did you ignore them? –  AnT Jul 22 '12 at 14:55
    
I'm not too sure, I'm still learning. –  TheBlueCat Jul 22 '12 at 14:59
    
if the compiler gives you a message its trying to help you out; even if its only a warning its a clue you did something bad –  pm100 Sep 3 '13 at 17:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you do indirection using, print_func(*hi); you are passing a char and it is one byte. So when you are trying to read an integer, which is larger, an access violation occurs. You should call your function with a pointer print_func(hi). And if you want to print the address of a string, it is better to use %p in printf:

printf("%p \n", hi); // print the address of hi

If you want to print the first character in hi, use %c instead:

printf("%c \n", *hi); // print first character of hi

If you want to print the value of the first character in hi, use %d instead, with casting:

printf("%d \n", (int)*hi); // print the value of the first character of hi

To print the whole string use %s and pass the pointer:

printf("%s \n", hi);
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I want to print the Value of char *hi, not the cell address. –  TheBlueCat Jul 22 '12 at 14:55
    
Okay, that prints a H, do I need to put my char into an array, to print out the whole 'string' per se. –  TheBlueCat Jul 22 '12 at 14:57
    
@TheBlueCat, updated the answer –  perreal Jul 22 '12 at 14:59
    
Many thanks! I got the print statement working. –  TheBlueCat Jul 22 '12 at 15:01

That's because you are passing a character value to the function and giving that as the address to the pointer variable "hi" in print_func. If your program was aimed at printing the string then this would be good -->

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char print_func(char *hi);

int main(void) {
    char *hi = "Hello, World!";
    print_func(hi);
}

char print_func(char *hi) {
    printf("%s \n", hi);
}
share|improve this answer

Even in the second case, I see a problem.

print_func(&hi);

You are passing the address of the pointer while you have to pass just pointer itself. Drop the & in function call.

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Well, your function is waiting a string as parameter, and you send a character or a pointer to string !

If you want to print the first character of the string, you should just send your string.

print_func(hi);
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