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I've been trying to understand how an update made from a different session will affect the session held by a runnning program, using JDBC with Oracle Driver (ojdbc6.jar, db version 11.2). I'm confused by the documentation over here, especially table 17-1: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/java.112/e16548/resltset.htm#JJDBC28628

Assuming the following code:

String SQL_QUERY = "select duration, cost from sample_table where name = ? and day = ? and type = ?";

PreparedStatement ps = connection.prepareStatement(SQL_QUERY);

ps.setString(1,name);
ps.setInt(2,day);
ps.setInt(3,type);

ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();

if (rs.next()) {
    SampleObject so = new SampleObject(); //default constructor
    so.setDuration(rs.getInt(1));
    so.setRate(rs.getDouble(2));
}

rs.close();
//and so on...

Suppose I have ran this query several times, for several different parameters, and my program has been running for a couple of hours.

Through a different session (in my case a sqldeveloper connection), I update this table (or delete a row from it) and commit the update.

Right after that, I query the table through the code but I do not see the updated results, I keep seeing the old values. I repeat my test and the results keep coming back with the old values.

I stop the running program, start it again with no changes and after repeating the test, I see the updated values.

What's going on? I haven't set any explicit cache mechanisms, the code to query the database is as simple as it can be. Is there any default caching going on? How can I guarantee I would always see the most updated values, regardless of which session has changed them?

EDIT: One thing that I did not mention at first: when this showed up my first thought was obviouslly "oh, I forgot to commit", then commited again. No changes. Run the test with the code on my local machine, saw the new values. Ran in the server, did not see.

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2  
Is that really the whole code you are showing us? Sounds like you changed the isolation level (e.g. through JDBC or using ALTER SESSION). –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 22 '12 at 16:09
    
the only piece I haven't shown is acquiring the connection, but the session wasn't changed in any way –  Vitor De Mario Jul 22 '12 at 16:12
1  
Try explicitely setting the isolation level to READ_COMMITTED (using an ALTER SESSION). –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 22 '12 at 16:13
    
But isn't READ_COMMITED the default isolation level? –  Vitor De Mario Jul 22 '12 at 16:17
1  
It is, but your description of the problem indicates that for some reason your program is not using that level. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 22 '12 at 16:18

1 Answer 1

Changes only occur when you COMMIT them. Before you do that, you can't see the changes. Afterward you can see the change.

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Well in the post Vitor writes: "I update this table .. and commit the update". So I assume his changes are being committed (if not that would also explain the problem). –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 22 '12 at 16:21
    
In that case there is no reason you shouldn't see the changes, so there is something wrong with your understanding of the situation. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 22 '12 at 16:29
    
I assume there is something wrong with my understanding, but I'm sure I have commited the changes. When this showed up my first thought was obviouslly "oh, I forgot to commit", then commited again. No changes. Run the test with the code on my local machine, saw the new values. Ran in the server, did not see. –  Vitor De Mario Jul 22 '12 at 16:38
    
@VitorDeMario: the "locally it's fine, on the server it's not" is new information. You did not mention this in your initial post. So apparently you are not telling us the whole story. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 22 '12 at 16:53
    
@a_horse_with_no_name I will edit to clarify that point. –  Vitor De Mario Jul 22 '12 at 17:14

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