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Consider the following code:

struct s
{
    const int id;

    s(int _id):
        id(_id)
    {}
};
// ...
vector<s> v;  v.push_back(s(1));

I get a compiler error that 'const int id' cannot use default assignment operator.

Q1. Why does push_back() need an assignment operator?
A1. Because the current c++ standard says so.

Q2. What should I do?

  • I don't want to give up the const specifier
  • I want the data to be copied

A2. I will use smart pointers.

Q3. I came up with a "solution", which seems rather insane:

s& operator =(const s& m)
{
    if(this == &m) return *this;
    this->~s();
    return *new(this) s(m);
}

Should I avoid this, and why (if so)? Is it safe to use placement new if the object is on the stack?

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1  
About #1, it's a dynamic array. It's going to have to copy (or move) the elements. –  chris Jul 22 '12 at 16:34
1  
&chris That's the part I don't get, it should copy and not assign –  Dave Jul 22 '12 at 16:36
4  
You could enable C++11 and the code will compile. –  KennyTM Jul 22 '12 at 16:36
1  
For Q3: you must absolutely check for self-assignment, and then say this->~s(); before the new call (as it is UB to overwrite the memory of an object whose destructor is non-trivial)... but I'm not sure if you're allowed to destroy an object inside its own member function. –  Kerrek SB Jul 22 '12 at 17:01
1  
If you want your data member to be copied during copy assignment it doesn't make any sense to declare it const. Why do you want it to be const or why don't you want to give up the const? –  Charles Bailey Jul 22 '12 at 17:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

C++03 requires that elements stored in containers be CopyConstructible and Assignable (see §23.1). So implementations can decide to use copy construction and assignment as they see fit. These constraints are relaxed in C++11. Explicitly, the push_back operation requirement is that the type be CopyInsertable into the vector (see §23.2.3 Sequence Containers)

Furthermore, C++11 containers can use move semantics in insertion operations and do on.

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Move assignment is no better than copy assignment when it comes to const members (i.e. it's disabled as well). –  Luc Danton Jul 22 '12 at 17:43
    
@LucDanton right, but there is no longer the requirement that the type be assignable. –  juanchopanza Jul 22 '12 at 18:27

Q2. What should I do?

Store pointers, preferably smart.

vector<unique_ptr<s>> v;
v.emplace_back(new s(1));
share|improve this answer

I don't want to give up the const specifier

Well, you have no choice.

s& operator =(const s& m) {
    return *new(this) s(m); 
}

Undefined behaviour.

There's a reason why pretty much nobody uses const member variables, and it's because of this. There's nothing you can do about it. const member variables simply cannot be used in types you want to be assignable. Those types are immutable, and that's it, and your implementation of vector requires mutability.

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Why is this undefined behavior? –  razeh Mar 6 at 23:06

It's not really a solution, but a workaround:

#include <vector>
struct s
{
  const int id;
  s(int _id):
    id(_id)
    {}
};

int main(){
  std::vector<s*> v;  
  v.push_back(new s(1));
  return 0;
}

This will store pointers of s instead of the object itself. At least it compiles... ;)

edit: you can enhance this with smart c++11 pointers. See Benjamin Lindley's answer.

share|improve this answer

Use a const_cast in the assignment operator:

S& operator=(const S& rhs)
{
    if(this==&rhs) return *this;
    int *pid=const_cast<int*>(&this->id);
    *pid=rhs.id;
    return *this;
}
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