Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For performance wise, some people suggest use the following method, e.g.

public class MyActivity extends Activity {  

 private static final String TAG = "MyApp";  
 private static final boolean D = true;

 @Override  public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    if(D) Log.e(TAG, "MyActivity.onCreate debug message");  }

But this is non-senese when are working on a large project, because when you debug, you need to update many files for the debug flag, are there any better method?

share|improve this question
    
The boolean test before call is the best solution if you consider also resource saving. You can use a static class to keep your boolean in only one place. Use BuildCondig.DEBUG as suggested. –  type-a1pha Jul 21 '13 at 12:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can check the DEBUG boolean in your BuildConfig:

if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
    // Do what you need
}

Or else, you can have a debug variable, but instead or keeping it in every activity, declare it in you Application class, and check it's value whenever you need.

If your purpose of that variable is for logging, is a good practice to wrap your loggings into another class, which checks the DEBUG variable:

public class LogUtils {
    public static void LOGD(final String tag, String message) {
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
            Log.d(tag, message);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGV(final String tag, String message) {
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
            Log.v(tag, message);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGI(final String tag, String message) {
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
            Log.i(tag, message);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGW(final String tag, String message) {
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
            Log.w(tag, message);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGE(final String tag, String message) {
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG) {
            Log.e(tag, message);
        }
    }

}

Then, make log calls to this class:

LogUtils.LOGD(TAG, "MyActivity.onCreate debug message");
share|improve this answer
    
Seems BuildConfig is what I need, but my project is old (2.2) so how to generate the BuildConfig using Eclipse (using latest SDK)? Thanks. first. –  Ryan Jul 22 '12 at 17:16
    
Are you unable to import this class?: your.package.name.BuildConfig –  Chinaski Jul 22 '12 at 17:17
    
I can found in gen folder, but seems there is a bug in ADT (code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=27940) so this method is not recommended. –  Ryan Jul 22 '12 at 17:22
    
To avoid that possible bug: Project -> Build Automatically | Project -> Clean | Project -> Build Project | Export Android application –  Chinaski Jul 22 '12 at 17:26
    
LogUtils doesn't avoid the overload due to string evaluation. –  type-a1pha Jul 21 '13 at 12:49

Another solution is found in one of the answers to this somewhat related question. You can override the Log class like this:

public class Log {
    static final boolean LOG = false;

    public static void i(String tag, String string) {
        if (LOG) android.util.Log.i(tag, string);
    }
    public static void e(String tag, String string) {
        if (LOG) android.util.Log.e(tag, string);
    }
    public static void d(String tag, String string) {
        if (LOG) android.util.Log.d(tag, string);
    }
    public static void v(String tag, String string) {
        if (LOG) android.util.Log.v(tag, string);
    }
    public static void w(String tag, String string) {
        if (LOG) android.util.Log.w(tag, string);
    }
}

This way, you don't need the if statement every time you use log. Just change the boolean in your overridden Log class. When you're ready to publish, you can use a tool like ProGuard to strip all the references to Log for performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't avoid the overload due to string evaluation. –  type-a1pha Jul 21 '13 at 12:47

I've written a LogWrapper class which is simple and looks something like this:

public class LogWrapper {
    private static final String DEBUG_TAG = "some-tag"
    private static boolean logsEnabled;

    public static void e(String msg) {
      if (logsEnabled) {      
        Log.e(DEBUG_TAG, msg);
      }
    }

    // other Log methods
}

You can use it instead of Log class, modifying the boolean variable as you wish in one place. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
The wrapper doesn't avoid the overload due to string evaluation. –  type-a1pha Jul 21 '13 at 12:49

I strongly recommend what Google guys developed at their open source app iosched. Among other reasons it keeps in mind BuildConfig and checks to see whether or not a log for the specified tag is loggable at the specified level with isLoggable. It's a must for my projects.

/*
 * Copyright 2012 Google Inc.
 *
 * Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
 * you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
 * You may obtain a copy of the License at
 *
 *      http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
 *
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
 * distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
 * WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
 * See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
 * limitations under the License.
 */

package com.google.android.apps.iosched.util;

import com.google.android.apps.iosched.BuildConfig;

import android.util.Log;

/**
 * Helper methods that make logging more consistent throughout the app.
 */
public class LogUtils {
    private static final String LOG_PREFIX = "iosched_";
    private static final int LOG_PREFIX_LENGTH = LOG_PREFIX.length();
    private static final int MAX_LOG_TAG_LENGTH = 23;

    public static String makeLogTag(String str) {
        if (str.length() > MAX_LOG_TAG_LENGTH - LOG_PREFIX_LENGTH) {
            return LOG_PREFIX + str.substring(0, MAX_LOG_TAG_LENGTH - LOG_PREFIX_LENGTH - 1);
        }

        return LOG_PREFIX + str;
    }

    /**
     * WARNING: Don't use this when obfuscating class names with Proguard!
     */
    public static String makeLogTag(Class cls) {
        return makeLogTag(cls.getSimpleName());
    }

    public static void LOGD(final String tag, String message) {
        if (Log.isLoggable(tag, Log.DEBUG)) {
            Log.d(tag, message);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGD(final String tag, String message, Throwable cause) {
        if (Log.isLoggable(tag, Log.DEBUG)) {
            Log.d(tag, message, cause);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGV(final String tag, String message) {
        //noinspection PointlessBooleanExpression,ConstantConditions
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG && Log.isLoggable(tag, Log.VERBOSE)) {
            Log.v(tag, message);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGV(final String tag, String message, Throwable cause) {
        //noinspection PointlessBooleanExpression,ConstantConditions
        if (BuildConfig.DEBUG && Log.isLoggable(tag, Log.VERBOSE)) {
            Log.v(tag, message, cause);
        }
    }

    public static void LOGI(final String tag, String message) {
        Log.i(tag, message);
    }

    public static void LOGI(final String tag, String message, Throwable cause) {
        Log.i(tag, message, cause);
    }

    public static void LOGW(final String tag, String message) {
        Log.w(tag, message);
    }

    public static void LOGW(final String tag, String message, Throwable cause) {
        Log.w(tag, message, cause);
    }

    public static void LOGE(final String tag, String message) {
        Log.e(tag, message);
    }

    public static void LOGE(final String tag, String message, Throwable cause) {
        Log.e(tag, message, cause);
    }

    private LogUtils() {
    }
}
share|improve this answer

An alternative approach, with less code, is to have these stripped out for the final release app using ProGuard.

Basically, in the app\proguard-rules.pro file, define the methods of the android.util.Log class that you want stripped out. The following addition to the proguard-rules.pro file will cause the v (verbose) and d (debug) methods to be stripped out at build time:

# This tell Proguard to assume Log.v and Log.d have no side effects (even
# though they do since they write to the logs) and thus can be removed
# during optimization:
-assumenosideeffects class android.util.Log {
    public static int v(...);
    public static int d(...);
}

This avoids the need for if (BuildConfig.DEBUG)-style checks peppered throughout the code.

Also see: Disable LogCat Output COMPLETELY in release Android app?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.