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Suppose I have a Master that keeps a list of SlaveThread objects. On each time step, I want the Master to run the SlaveThreads in parallel, however, at the end of the time step, I want the SlaveThreads to to wait for each other to complete the current time step before advancing forward. Also, I don't want to reinstantiate the SlaveThreads on each time step. I have 2 possible solutions, and I don't know how to make either of them work:

1) The run() method in SlaveThread is in a while(true) loop. After the execution of a single loop in the SlaveThread, I'll have SlaveThread notify the Master(which I don't know how to do), and the Master does something like

try{
    for (int i = 0; i < numSlaveThreads; i++) {
        while (!slaveThreads[i].getCompletedThisIter()) {
        wait()
        }
      }
  System.out.println("Joined");

}

before advancing to the next time step. How would I do this? How can I have a single SlaveThread notify just the master?

2) The run() in Slave is not in while(true) loop, then I have to call start() on it on every iteration. But the thread state of the Slave at this point will be terminated. How can I call start() on it again without reinstantiating it?

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Sounds like you want a cyclic barrier: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… (Using variant 1.) –  millimoose Jul 22 '12 at 17:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That is exactly what barriers are for, you can realize this with a CyclicBarrier or a CountDownLatch. These are synchronizers used to delay the progress of threads until the desired state is reached, in your case the threads have completed their computation.

Here it depends on the details how you want to realize:

Latches are for waiting for events; barriers are for waiting for other threads.

For the CyclicBarrier that would done in the following fashion:

// whereby count is the number of your slave threads
this.barrier = new CyclicBarrier(count); 

Then in the Runnable definition of your slaves you will insert at the end of the computation: barrier.await()

public class Slaves implements Runnable {

   // ...

   @Override
   public void run() {

      while(condition) {

         // computation
         // ...

         try {
            // do not proceed, until all [count] threads
            // have reached this position
            barrier.await();
         } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
            return;
         } catch (BrokenBarrierException ex) {
            return;
         }
      }
   }
}

Your slave threads will not proceed, until all your threads have finished the computation. This way you do not need to realize signaling between another master thread.

If, however, you have some code you want to execute after all threads have reached that position (master signaling) you can pass an additional Runnable to the CyclicBarrier constructor, which will be executed after all threads have arrived at the barrier.

this.barrier = new CyclicBarrier(count,
   new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
         // signal your master thread, update values, etc.
      }
    }
 );
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I want to wait for other threads to tell the master that they are done with their current iteration (so that they can all at the same time proceed to the next one) –  Trup Jul 22 '12 at 18:04
    
How do I make the cyclic barrier restart the count at the end of 1 iteration? You said that each thread by calling await() decreases the counter by 1 until it gets to 0, but at that point, I want to restart the counter back to numThreads, so that the next cycle gets executed. –  Trup Jul 22 '12 at 19:00
    
@Trup You don't have to worry about that, this happens automatically, that's why it is called cyclic barrier, it can be reused as often as you want. –  platzhirsch Jul 22 '12 at 19:12
    
And how would I count the total number of iterations executed? (the total number of time steps) –  Trup Jul 22 '12 at 19:25
    
@Trup You could for instance increment an integer value in the optional Runnable you can pass to the constructor as I have explained at the end of my answer. –  platzhirsch Jul 22 '12 at 19:27

You could use a combination of an ExecutorService to manage your threads (i.e. you recycle your threads without having to create new ones at each cycle) and a CyclicBarrier which will synchronize all the slaves.

See below a simple example where the master launches the slaves in a loop, making sure they are all done before starting again. The slaves, being a bit lazy, just sleep for some (not really random) time:

public class Test {

    private static final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);
    private static final CyclicBarrier barrier = new CyclicBarrier(5); //4 slaves + 1 master

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Runnable master = new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    while (true) {
                        System.out.println("Starting slaves");
                        for (int i = 100; i < 500; i += 100) {
                            executor.submit(getRunnable(i));
                        }
                        barrier.await();
                        System.out.println("All slaves done");
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException | BrokenBarrierException ex) {
                    System.out.println("Bye Bye");
                }
            }
        };

        executor.submit(master);
        Thread.sleep(2000);
        executor.shutdownNow();

    }

    public static Runnable getRunnable(final int sleepTime) {
        return new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    System.out.println("Entering thread " + Thread.currentThread() + " for " + sleepTime + " ms.");
                    Thread.sleep(sleepTime);
                    System.out.println("Exiting thread " + Thread.currentThread());
                    barrier.await();
                } catch (BrokenBarrierException | InterruptedException ex) {
                }
            }
        };

    }
}
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Which is the code for the slaves? Also, can I just do it with a cyclic barrier and no execution service? Can you show me how this would look? Basically, I want to see explicitly how the slave tells the cyclic barrier it is done, and how the master uses the cyclic barrier to wait for all slaves to finish. Thanks! –  Trup Jul 22 '12 at 18:02
    
The slaves' runnables are generated by getRunnable(i). You can use a cyclicbarrier without the executorservice. You only need to setup the barrier with the right number. Everytime barrier.await() is called, the calling thread waits and that number is decremented. When the number reaches 0 all the waiting threads start working again. –  assylias Jul 22 '12 at 18:05
    
I suggest you run the program I posted to see how it works and adapt it for your needs. –  assylias Jul 22 '12 at 18:06

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