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I've played a little with SQLite in the past, and I like it enough that I want to use it for a new project.

Step 1 is creating the database, and I need to create a DateStamp field where I place a time stamp on when an event occurred.

In the SQLite Documentation, the Date and Time Datatype is defined as follows:

1.2 Date and Time Datatype

SQLite does not have a storage class set aside for storing dates and/or times. Instead, the built-in Date And Time Functions of SQLite are capable of storing dates and times as TEXT, REAL, or INTEGER values:

  • TEXT as ISO8601 strings ("YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.SSS").
  • REAL as Julian day numbers, the number of days since noon in Greenwich on November 24, 4714 B.C. according to the proleptic Gregorian calendar.
  • INTEGER as Unix Time, the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC.

Applications can chose to store dates and times in any of these formats and freely convert between formats using the built-in date and time functions.

I'd rather not save dates as text, and since the Windows DateTime object does not go back to November 24, 4714 B.C., I supposed I'm left with storing DateTime values as an INTEGER.

So, how do I store the DateTime as an Integer? Would I get the TimeSpan between base date and date I want, extract the number of days, and store that?

// is this a UTC date?
private static readonly DateTime utc1970_01_01 = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1);

public static double GetIntDate(DateTime dateTime) {
  // FYI: subtracting dates in .NET returns a time span object
  return (dateTime - nov24_4714bc).TotalSeconds;
}

Is that right? Is this what everyone else is doing that uses SQLite?

It also says that SQLite stores datetime in UTC time, so I need to convert again on top of that.

Surely someone has done this before. I would appreciate seeing tools someone has made already that handles these inputs. SQLite has some built in functions, but I don't really understand how to use them.

Solved:

Well poo.

Could it be as simple as this?

public static long ToFileTimeUtc(DateTime dateTime) {
  return dateTime.ToFileTimeUtc();
}

public static DateTime FromFileTimeUtc(long fileTimeUtc) {
  return DateTime.FromFileTimeUtc(fileTimeUtc);
}

Comments?

Can I not do that?

share|improve this question
1  
if you feel your question is answered by your answer, please un-delete your answer and remove [solved] from the question title. –  naveen Jul 22 '12 at 18:50
    
Now I am going crazy! Mystere Man says I need to remove it (and I get a downvote), now you say I should add it back. Trying to be politically correct on SO is difficult and confusing. –  jp2code Jul 22 '12 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well poo.

Could it be as simple as this?

public static long ToFileTimeUtc(DateTime dateTime) {
  return dateTime.ToFileTimeUtc();
}

public static DateTime FromFileTimeUtc(long fileTimeUtc) {
  return DateTime.FromFileTimeUtc(fileTimeUtc);
}

Comments?

Can I not do that?

share|improve this answer
2  
Don't add additional information as a question. Edit your original question. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jul 22 '12 at 18:03
    
But then, if I never get an answer for "How to do this?", what do I mark as a solution? Your answer, though good, does not address how to store a Windows DateTime value to an Integer or how to get it back. –  jp2code Jul 22 '12 at 18:16
    
You aren't providing an answer, you're adding more to your question, it belongs in the question itself, not as an answer. My answer was in response to your question, which provides how to do it. I'm just telling you that yes, you can do that given the right context. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jul 22 '12 at 18:24
    
If you're asking another question, open an new question. –  Kyle Trauberman Jul 22 '12 at 18:32
    
Update: This appears to work great. I don't know and I don't care if the Windows version of FileTime is or is not what SQLite is expecting, but my values go into the database and pull back out of the database as expected. –  jp2code Jul 23 '12 at 13:52

Whether or not you can use FileTime depends on whether anything but your app will ever be accessing the data. FileTime represents the number of 100-nanosecond intervals since January 1, 1601 (UTC).

As such, you will need to make sure the integer is an 8 byte integer in SQLLite in order to store the entire value.

As long as your app is the only app to deal with this data, and you always use FileTime, then there's no problem. If others will access this data, and they're capable of understanding FileTime, and they are aware that this is what it is, then there is also no problem.

share|improve this answer
    
What format are you suggesting I use to store DateTime values? Second, what method do you recommend to get the DateTime value to and from your unspoken format? –  jp2code Jul 22 '12 at 19:00
    
@jp2code - I suggest you reread my message.. I told you what format to store it in, specifically an 8 byte integer. And I said you could use the method you suggested in your answer that wasn't an answer. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jul 22 '12 at 19:19

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