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How to exclude specific descendants of a node? In this direction, the expression *[not(self::nodetag)] seems just to discriminate at a child level of the node, accepting all other descedants in the returned node set. I want a expression to select all under div but those nodes that are not a, see example below. The tree structure must remain the same.

The approach poste by @Dimitri Novatchev seems to be right but not for HAP implementation:

Using this example document:

<div>
  <span>
     <a>lala</a>
  </span>
</div>

The HAP would return the following structure with his suggested expression /div/descendant::node()[not(self::a)]

<div>
  <span>
     <a>lala</a>
  </span>
</div>
<span>
     <a>lala</a>
 </span>

If there would be another tag other than a nested on span, it would also return it as a separte tree, any one know about this strange behavior? Is it a HAP bug?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Definitely seems like a bug -- to determine if this is so, you need to provide a complete (but small) code example, so that other people could reproduce this. Also, this isn't either an XPath or an XSLT question -- it is a HAP-specific question. – Dimitre Novatchev Jul 22 '12 at 20:15
    
I think that most likely the XPath expression you are using is: //*[not(self::a)] In this case the result produced by HAP is correct. – Dimitre Novatchev Jul 22 '12 at 20:18
    
Yes, both expressions return the same, so I agree it should be a HAP bug as usual. – Devela Jul 22 '12 at 20:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I want a expression to select all under div but those nodes that are not a. The tree structure must remain the same.

Use:

/div/descendant::node()[not(self::a)]

This selects any descendant of the top element div that (the descendant) is not an a.

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:for-each select="/div/descendant::node()[not(self::a)]">
    <xsl:value-of select="concat('&#xA;', position(), '. &quot;')"/>
    <xsl:copy-of select="."/>"
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<div>
    <span>
        <a>lala</a>
    </span>
</div>

the XPath expression is evaluated and all selected nodes are output with proper formatting to make them well-visible:

1. "
    "

2. "<span>

   <a>lala</a>

</span>"

3. "
        "

4. "lala"

5. "
    "

6. "
"

As we can see, 6 nodes are selected -- one span element, four whitespace-only text nodes and one non-whitespace-only text node -- and none of them is an a.

Update:

In a comment the OP has clarified that he actually wants the XML document to be transformed into another, in which any a descendant of a div is omitted.

Here is one such transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="div//a"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the same XML document (above), the (wwhat I guess is) wanted result is produced:

<div>
   <span/>
</div>

If we want to produce only the descendants of any div that has an a descendant, then we need almost the same transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="div[.//a]"><xsl:apply-templates/></xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="div//a"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

The result of this applied to the same XML document as above is:

<span/>
share|improve this answer
    
This would return a weird structure, not the original, using the example I posted: It would return the div with all the structure but then then also the span as a separate node which was already under div. – Devela Jul 22 '12 at 19:30
    
@Devela: XPath is a query language for XML documents -- as such it doesn't alter the structure (delete or insert nodes) of the XML document -- it just selects existing nodes. In case you want to get a different XML document from the source XML document, then what you need is not an XPath expression, but an XML transformation -- and this is trivial to achieve using XSLT. – Dimitre Novatchev Jul 22 '12 at 19:35
    
Maybe I wasnt clear. I am using Html Agility Pack for the query, and some how it is returning the following: <div> <span> </span> </div> <span> </span> – Devela Jul 22 '12 at 19:39
    
Obviously, the second span which isnt expected is the same as above. – Devela Jul 22 '12 at 19:41
    
By the way the a nodes are still there. – Devela Jul 22 '12 at 19:44

@Devela: you are confusing the set of nodes selected by the XPath expression with the way that they are then displayed by the application that issued the request. It's quite common for an application to display a node by showing the whole subtree rooted at that node. So if your query is //div, and one of the selected div elements contains an <a> node as a descendant, the results will be shown including that <a> element. You can't change that by changing the XPath expression, because the XPath expression didn't select the <a> element; you can only change it by changing the way the results are displayed.

Now, if you want to display a <div> element that is like the <div> element in your source except that the <a> is omitted, then you are outside the scope of what XPath can do. XPath can only choose a subset of the nodes in your input tree, it can't create a modified tree. For that, you need XSLT or XQuery.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not wanting to modify the structure but just excluding a nodes from the tree. One approach could be this /div/*[not(self::item)] but this should just work for children. Dimitre answer is also correct because it excludes all a nodes from the entire subtree and keep the rest of the structure, it does what I need, but HAP is not doing it right. I tried with another tool and it selected the right nodes. – Devela Jul 22 '12 at 21:54
1  
Exluding a node from a tree modifies the tree. – Michael Kay Jul 23 '12 at 15:24
    
As Dimitre points out, some nodes can be left out using pure xpath, even when it is not meant to be used for transformation as xslt. However you also make a point xpath is not meant for transformations. However you may want to test /div/descendant::node()[not(self::a)] that will select everything but those a descendants in the tree. I was trying to find something in the w3c specs but havent found anything. – Devela Jul 24 '12 at 1:28
    
I clear up with Dimitre, so you were right, as well as his answer. I chose his answer because he posted first. – Devela Jul 29 '12 at 3:13

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