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If I do this:

$('.classname').html(Math.floor(Math.random()*10)+1);

All of "classname" is filled with the same number. Is it possible to fill every instance of "classname" with a different random number?

The only possible way I can think of solving this is to go through each instance of "class name" and apply a random number one by one.

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

the html method has an "overload" that accepts a function. The function should return the value to set the inner html to. In your case you can do:

$(".classname").html(function() {
    return (Math.floor(Math.random()*10)+1);
});

the function is actually called with two arguments. The first is the index of the element in the selection and the second is the current value of the elements inner html

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.html()

$(".classname").html(function(idx, oldValue) {
    return (Math.floor(Math.random()*10)+1);
});

fiddle

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You can use jQuery's .each() function to iterate over each element matching the selector you provide -

$.each('.classname',function(index,elem){
  var newRandomNumber = (Math.random()*10)+1;
  $(elem).html(Math.floor(newRandomNumber));
});

For every iteration of the each() function, you'll have the index of the element you are on and the element itself in the elem parameters.


http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.each/

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gah... embarrassing :P Thanks @rune! –  Lix Jul 22 '12 at 20:21
1  
you can substitute this for $(elem) –  Rune FS Jul 22 '12 at 20:22
    
I always like to be as verbose as I can to improve readability - the each function defines both an index and a value argument, so I like to use what is provided :) –  Lix Jul 22 '12 at 20:24
1  
the down side of that is that you have a selection that you don't need. I agree that readability is important but I also believe using this here is idiomatic so you get readability (if the reader is jQuery proficient) and speed –  Rune FS Jul 22 '12 at 20:26
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try this

$('.classname').each(function(index) {
    $(this).html(Math.floor(Math.random()*10)+1);
});
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Yes. The easiest way to do so would be using the jQuery each function:

$('.classname').each(function() {
    $(this).html(Math.floor(Math.random()*10)+1);
});
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