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I seem to be unable to use multiple layers of templates in the following manner,

template <typename T>
template <T value>
void printValueAsInteger()
{
    printf("value as integer is %i\n", (int) value);
}

so that it could be called as:

printValueAsInteger<123>();

It results in the following error message: too many template-parameter-lists.

It works if I use template <typename T, T value> with printValueAsInteger<int, 123>(), but that requires me to explicitly specify the type. How can I make it so that printValueAsInteger<123>() prints value as integer is 123?

edit:

I'll be more specific in what I need this for. My goal is to pass a member function as a function pointer, and I thought of wrapping it using templates:

template <typename T>
template <T* instance, void (T::*method)()>
void wrappedMethod()
{
    (instance->*method)();
}
void callFunction(void (*function)())
{
    (*function)();
}

and then pass it like this:

Base *instance = new Derived;
callFunction(&wrappedFunction<instance, Base::method>);

edit:

Err, I just realised that I probably shouldn't (and can't) use a runtime-defined variable as a template argument. I'm now trying to work around it using a class instantiated with the otherwise template arguments and creating a template function which uses that class. Or something like that. Nope, doesn't work.

Note that I cannot change the signature of callFunction, as it's part of a third party API.

At last!

I put the following in a header,

class Callable
{
public:
    virtual ~Callable() { }
    virtual void call() { }
};

typedef void (*functionPtr)();
extern unsigned nextMethodId;
extern functionPtr wrappedMethods[];
extern Callable *boundMethods[];

template <unsigned I>
class MethodWrapper
{
public:
    static void function();
};

template <typename T>
class Method : public Callable
{
public:
    Method(T* instance, void (T::*method)());
    virtual void call();
private:
    T* instance;
    void (T::*method)();
};

template <typename T>
Method<T>::Method(T* instance, void (T::*method)())
    : instance(instance), method(method) {
}

template <typename T>
void Method<T>::call()
{
    if (instance && method)
        (instance->*method)();
}

template <typename T>
static functionPtr bindMethod(T* instance, void (T::*method)())
{
    boundMethods[nextMethodId] = new Method<T>(instance, method);
    return (void (*)()) wrappedMethods[nextMethodId++];
}

and this in a source file:

#include "<insert header name here>.h"

unsigned nextMethodId = 0;
functionPtr wrappedMethods[] = {
    &MethodWrapper<0>::function,
    &MethodWrapper<1>::function,
    &MethodWrapper<2>::function
};
Callable *boundMethods[sizeof(wrappedMethods) / sizeof(functionPtr)];

template <unsigned I>
void MethodWrapper<I>::function()
{
    boundMethods[I]->call();
}

and I could use it like this:

Base *instance = new Derived;
void (*function)() = bindMethod(instance, &Base::method);
callFunction(function);

It successfully calls the derived instance's version of the method. Sadly, the amount of methods you are allowed to bind is fixed (three in this example), but it's easily extendable.

share|improve this question
2  
Sorry, not possible unless you fix the type of the non-type template parameter. See also this question. –  Xeo Jul 22 '12 at 20:19
    
Why don't you use std::bind or boost::bind simply? –  Mr.Anubis Jul 22 '12 at 20:34
    
@Mr.Anubis Because I am unaware of the many benefits of using std or boost. –  RPFeltz Jul 22 '12 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

A simple transform is having the runtime value be an argument to the constructor of a functor that holds the instance pointer and the pointer to member function. The syntax at the place of use will change from:

Base *instance = new Derived;
callFunction(&wrappedFunction<instance, Base::method>);

To:

callFunction( WrappedFunction<Base,&Base::method>( instance ) );

The implementation of the WrappedFunction type is actually simple, so I leave it as an exercise. Note that a major change in this approach is that the argument to callFunction becomes a functor, and not a function pointer.

In C++11 (or with boost) the simplest way would be not coding anything and just use the available resources. Change the signature of callFunction to:

void callFunction( function<void ()> f );

And use bind to place the call:

callFunction( bind( &Base::method, instance ) );
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that the OP says that callFunction is part of an API from a third party, so it seems that the signature of callFunction cannot be changed. –  Jesse Good Jul 22 '12 at 21:47
    
The argument of callFunction does not become a functor; pointers to members are not functors (they're not compatible with the f(a0, a1, ..., aN) syntax). –  Luc Danton Jul 22 '12 at 22:12
    
@LucDanton: I should have been more clear: with this change in design, callFunction would be changed to receive a functor instead of a pointer to member function –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 2:05
    
@JesseGood: I did not realize that. If the signature of callFunction cannot be changed, then there is little that can be done in the sense that you cannot use a member function (which requires state) as a function that holds no state. There is always the possibility of global state (i.e. create a free function that will use a global object), but that is not a solution in the general term. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 2:08

For your first example, you can specify int as the type of template parameter:

template <int I>
void printValueAsInteger()
{
    printf("value as integer is %i\n", I);
}

For your edit, you cannot use runtime-defined variables as you have already mentioned because templates are used at compile-time. Using std::bind and std::function would make it simple:

void callFunction(std::function<void()> f)
{
    f();
}

Base *instance = new Derived;
callFunction(std::bind(&Base::method, instance));

After Comment

The only way I can think of is to make your member function static:

callFunction(&Base::method); // Okay if the method is declared static

Or use a global wrapper function with a global instance:

Base *instance = new Derived; // Global
void wrapperFunction()
{
    instance->method();
}

callFunction(wrapperFunction);
share|improve this answer
    
I need the callFunction to use a pointer, as it is part of an API for a library from a third party. std::function probably won't do, unless it can be converted to a function pointer, which I doubt. –  RPFeltz Jul 22 '12 at 20:58
    
@RpFeltz: That makes it a lot harder. The only way I can think of is to make your member function static. –  Jesse Good Jul 22 '12 at 21:39
    
Actually, perhaps I could put the information about the method in an externally linked array, and use the address of that as template argument... I'll try it. –  RPFeltz Jul 22 '12 at 21:39
    
@RPFeltz: I don't know why I didn't think of it before, but you could use a global wrapper and global instance. –  Jesse Good Jul 22 '12 at 21:58
    
That was the initial plan, but I was wondering if there was a less boring way than repeating this for thirty-or-so methods. –  RPFeltz Jul 22 '12 at 22:03

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