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I will try to explain me, yet it is confused until for me.
I'm developing a weekly calendar where the user do click over a cell, a prompt is showed for a comfirmation action and then the cell is repainted. Let's make this more detailed:

Html markup:

<td> <a class="free"></a> </td>

JS code looks like this (pseudocode):

$(".free").click(function() {
    alert('engaging');
    $(this).text("taken");
    $(this).removeClass("free").addClass("taken");
})

What's going wrong here? Well, once the element class is replaced with "taken" instead of "free", if the user click again over this link the alert is showed again, where it should not!

I think that this example in jsfiddle ilustrate my scenario

Thank you in advance

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Why are you referencing the class as "libre" on the removing? –  YuriAlbuquerque Jul 22 '12 at 21:19
    
sorry, it is a typo –  manix Jul 22 '12 at 21:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The click handler will still be attached to the element, even if you change it's class dynamically, you have to remove the handler with off().

$(".free").on('click', function(){
     alert('engaging');
     $(this).text("reservada").removeClass("free").addClass("taken").off('click');
});

FIDDLE

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I did not know nothing about off() function. Now my calendar is working as is expected. Thank you so much! and the rest of people too! –  manix Jul 22 '12 at 21:32

Your original syntax binds the handler to the element itself, and the handler is only bound once. Any subsequent changes to the class of the element will not affect the handler. Use a delegated event instead. http://api.jquery.com/on/

$(document).on('click','.free', function() {

    alert('engaging');

    $(this).text("taken");
    $(this).removeClass("free").addClass("taken");
});

Demo

If you have more than one element with class .free, and if you can dynamically add or remove this class with multiple clicks, using this type of handler will allow you to only catch 'click' events on elements which currently have class .free. Also note that the alternative, using .off, means that even if you add .free to the element again, the handler will not fire -- nor will any other 'click' handlers bound to that element.

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1  
This is closer to the "CSS experience" the op is expecting :P +1 –  Esailija Jul 22 '12 at 21:35
    
I will keep it in mind :) –  manix Jul 22 '12 at 21:37

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