Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote below code to satisfy program requirement as follows:

Average of Three Write a program that reads three whole numbers and displays the average of the three numbers.

Input Notes: Three whole numbers (non-negative integers) are entered at the console.

Output Notes (Prompts and Labels): The program prompts for the three integers with these strings: "Enter the first integer.", "Enter the second integer.", "Enter the third integer.". The program then prints         The average of NUMBER1,  NUMBER2,  and NUMBER3  = AVG   where NUMBER1  is the first integer value entered and NUMBER2  and NUMBER3  the subsequent integers, and AVG  is the computed average value.

SPECIFICATION OF NAMES: Your application class should be called Average3:

My source code:

import java.util.Scanner;
public class Average3 {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int AVG, NUMBER1, NUMBER2, NUMBER3;
        System.out.println("Enter the first integer.");
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        NUMBER1 = keyboard.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Enter the second integer.");
        NUMBER2 = keyboard.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Enter the third integer.");
        NUMBER3 = keyboard.nextInt();
        AVG = (NUMBER1 + NUMBER2 + NUMBER3) / 3;
        System.out.println("The average of NUMBER1, NUMBER2, and NUMBER3 = " + AVG);

    }

}

My program compiles fine but I know I could have implemented and invoked an object with an associated method but am struggling where to start I understand the methods and objects conceptually but not as far as writing code. Anyone have any suggestions?

share|improve this question
1  
try reading some introduction courses to java, or your schoolbook. its all pretty well explained on the net. –  Michael Dibbets Jul 22 '12 at 21:53
2  
Try looking either at the learning trails. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/concepts/index.html –  Wes Jul 22 '12 at 21:54
    
i did STFW also RTFM but still struggling to make it gel –  gucciv12 Jul 22 '12 at 21:54
    
so you dont know how to write the method to calculate the avg ? methodname: e.g calcAVG with three parameters ( number 1 - 3 ) and you need a return value from type int. google how to create a method and what a return value and parameters are –  dontcare Jul 22 '12 at 21:57
    
programming is best learned by trial and error. just start writing, get familiar, analise pieces of code others have written and make it your own. –  Michael Dibbets Jul 22 '12 at 21:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, I would create a class InputData that would store the inputs from the user:

class InputData {
    public int number1;
    public int number2;
    public int number3;
}

This in itself is a useful general technique: collect several related values into a single data structure. You can then either rewrite your main method to use this class instead of three separate int variables, or you can go one step further and add some behavior to the InputData class. The obvious first behavior to add would be to compute the average:

class InputData {
    public int number1;
    public int number2;
    public int number3;

    public int average() {
        return (number1 + number2 + number3) / 3;
    }
}

With this, you could rewrite your main as follows:

public class Average3 {
    static class InputData {
        public int number1;
        public int number2;
        public int number3;

        public int average() {
            return (number1 + number2 + number3) / 3;
        }
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        InputData input = new InputData();
        System.out.println("Enter the first integer.");
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        input.number1 = keyboard.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Enter the second integer.");
        input.number2 = keyboard.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Enter the third integer.");
        input.number3 = keyboard.nextInt();
        System.out.println("The average of NUMBER1, NUMBER2, and NUMBER3 = "
            + input.average());
    }
}

Notice that I've made InputData a static inner class of Average3. It could also have been a separate, top-level class in the same file (as long as it wasn't public) or a class in a separate file.

An improvement on this would be to use an array instead of separate int fields in the InputData class. Your program might then look like this:

public class Average3 {
    static class InputData {
        public int[] numbers;

        InputData(int size) {
            numbers = new int[size];
        }

        public int average() {
            int sum = 0;
            for (int number : numbers) {
                sum += number;
            }
            return sum / numbers.length;
        }
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] prompts = { "first", "second", "third" };
        InputData input = new InputData(3);
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        for (int i = 0; i < prompts.length; ++i) {
            System.out.println("Enter the " + prompts[i] + " integer.");
            input.numbers[i] = keyboard.nextInt();
        }
        System.out.println("The average of NUMBER1, NUMBER2, and NUMBER3 = "
            + input.average());
    }
}

Here I've added a constructor to InputData to initialize the array and given it an argument to set the size of the array.

You could then introduce additional improvements like making the number of input values dynamic (using an ArrayList<Integer> instead of an int array). But this goes beyond the specific requirements of the assignment. Some people (many, actually) tend to do this kind of generalization automatically. However, advocates of Extreme Programming will point out that it is generally better to keep things simple: design and code for the needs of today instead of those of tomorrow, next week, or next month.

In other words, you don't know what the next assignment will bring, so however you generalize beyond the immediate assignment might be wasted work.

share|improve this answer
    
awesome progressive solution thanks! –  gucciv12 Jul 23 '12 at 7:31

I don't know if I would have gone with objects for such a simple task. however, since you asked, I'll explain how I would do it if objects are necessary,

I would create an object (class) which has an ArrayList<Integer>, this way you could calculate the average of more than just 3 numbers.

this object would have 2 public methods. void addNumber(int number) and double/int getAverage() addNumber would simply add a number to the arraylist, and getAverage would traverse over the entire list, sum up all the numbers, and divide it by its size (don't forget -1)

In the main, you create a new object of that class, then each scan of the scanner, inserts the inputed number to the array list using the addNumber method.

I think that how I would do it, given that I was instructed to use objects.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer

as a very basic example, in one .java file you can create a class that "knows how" to get input and create averages, something like:

// takes input and stores in a list which it 
// can do mathematical operations on
class InputMath
{
    // ivar to store input
    private List<int> list;

    // contructor
    public AverageInput() {}

    // gets user input and pushes to `list`
    public void getInput(String question) {}

    // works out the average of `list`
    public int average() {}

    // works out the total of `list`
    public int total() {}

    ...
}

and then you can use the class where you want, like in your 'main' function

import InputMath;

class Main
{
    public static void main(String args)
    {
        InputMath im = new InputMath();

        for(int i=0; i<3; i++)
        {
            im.getInput("Enter number " + (i+1));
        }
        System.out.println(im.average());
    }
}

but like many of the comments have suggested you really need to read through some material/references/examples and 'play around'

share|improve this answer

This is a brief example on how to make your program using a very simple class.

You could easyly change it and ask how many numbers you want to calculate the average.

/* using default package */

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Scanner;

/**
 * The Class Average3.
 */
public class Average3 {

    /** The number list. */
    private List<Integer> numberList;

    /** The sum. */
    private float sum;

    /**
     * Instantiates a new my first class.
     */
    public Average3() {
        this.numberList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        this.sum = 0;
    }

    /**
     * Adds the integer.
     *
     * @param integer the integer
     */
    public void addInteger(int integer) {
        this.numberList.add(integer);
        this.sum += integer;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the average.
     *
     * @return the average
     */
    public float getAverage() {
        return (this.sum/this.numberList.size());
    }

    /**
     *  Prints the Average.
     */
    public void printAverage() {
        System.out.print("The average of ");
        for(int j = 0; j < this.numberList.size()-1; j++) {
            Integer i = this.numberList.get(j);
            System.out.print(i.toString() + ", ");
        }

        System.out.print("and " + numberList.get(numberList.size()-1));
        System.out.println(" = " + this.getAverage());
    }

    /**
     * The main method.
     *
     * @param args the arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Average3 myClass = new Average3();

        System.out.println("Enter the first integer.");
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

        myClass.addInteger(keyboard.nextInt());

        System.out.println("Enter the second integer.");
        myClass.addInteger(keyboard.nextInt());

        System.out.println("Enter the third integer.");
        myClass.addInteger(keyboard.nextInt());

        myClass.printAverage();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Your average computation is really buggy. Based on this method, the average of 2, 2, 2 and 2 is... 0. And why compute the average (and repeat the same bug) at two places? Don't repeat yourself! –  JB Nizet Jul 22 '12 at 22:17
1  
Beware of integer division! –  Ted Hopp Jul 23 '12 at 0:24
    
sure, really forgot that division does require float-precision numbers :D –  Nuno Aniceto Jul 23 '12 at 9:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.