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I've looked at other similar questions on Stacked and even used an example, which I will post below that says it should return an integer but I still get an array...

So.. How come I'm getting an array and how do I get an integer instead?

function user_exists($username){
    $result = mysql_query("SELECT COUNT(username) FROM logins");

    // Verify it worked
    if (!$result) echo mysql_error();

    $row = mysql_fetch_row($result);

    // Should show you an integer result.
    print_r($row);


    }

This outputs: "Array ( [0] => 1 )". The comment says it should be an integer. Any help greatly appreciated!

The above code was for test purposes only, Iam actually trying to test the value of a SELECT COUNT and return it a true (or false) boolean in a function:

function user_exists($username){
    $query = mysql_query("SELECT COUNT (username) FROM `logins` WHERE `username`='$username'");
    return (mysql_result($query, 0)==1) ? true: false;
    }

but the $query var is an array not a single value

share|improve this question
2  
Also, you really should be migrating over to the PDO object. Much safer to use when accessing MySQL. –  Fluffeh Jul 23 '12 at 0:34
1  
@Fluffeh Excellent point (I was just about to comment). @gavin - See the red box)? The mysql_* functions are being deprecated. There is absolutely no reason why you should use them for new code. Switch to prepared statements and PDO or MySQLi instead. –  Ricardo Altamirano Jul 23 '12 at 0:37
    
@Fluffeh, Ricardo Altamirano: it becomes annoying, really –  zerkms Jul 23 '12 at 0:38
    
@zerkms Sorry, what is annoying? –  Fluffeh Jul 23 '12 at 0:42
    
@Fluffeh: mentioning pdo/mysqli in every php&mysql-related question (even 100% irrelevant to the parameters binding and prepared statements. In this particular case there is no difference between mysql_ and pdo/mysqli) –  zerkms Jul 23 '12 at 0:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It returns a row with one column, use $row[0] to get the value form the first column.

As implied by the function name, mysql_fetch_row is expected to return a row, in the form of an array with an element for each column in the result set.

From PHP docs:

Return Values

Returns an numerical array of strings that corresponds to the fetched row, or FALSE if there are no more rows.

mysql_fetch_row() fetches one row of data from the result associated with the specified result identifier. The row is returned as an array. Each result column is stored in an array offset, starting at offset 0.

As commented by Ricardo and Fluffeh, this interface is deprecated and you should use PDO. Before PDO, PHP lacked an unified interface to databases, and it was really hard to switch databases in a project. Using PDO makes easy to support multiple databases, and prepared statements makes your code more secure against SQL injection attacks.

[update]

Thanks, perhaps the mysql_row is not the best method, I only used it for test purposes. I am actually trying to insert the result into a mysql_result, as a number but it is an array, so I believe the SELECT COUNT returns an array originally, when I thought it was meant to return an integer. really I want the $result=mysql_query("SELECT COUNT") to be a single value.. Hmmmm..?

If you really want to fetch the value as an integer, you can use this instead:

// $row = mysql_fetch_row($result);
$row = mysql_result($result, 0, 0); // first row, first column
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, perhaps the mysql_row is not the best method, I only used it for test purposes. I am actually trying to insert the result into a mysql_result, as a number but it is an array, so I believe the SELECT COUNT returns an array originally, when I thought it was meant to return an integer. really I want the $result=mysql_query("SELECT COUNT") to be a single value.. Hmmmm..? –  gavin Jul 23 '12 at 0:50
    
You can use mysql_result($result, 0, 0) instead. –  Paulo Scardine Jul 23 '12 at 0:52
    
Thanks, I will try this out. One question, though - is SELECT COUNT not meant to return a single value anyway? Everywhere I read, it says so but in my example it doesn't seem to be. –  gavin Jul 23 '12 at 1:10
    
@gavin: this query returns a single row and column indeed, but a result set is always rows and columns, even if the result is 1 X 1 like in this case. BTW, would you mark my answer as accepted now? –  Paulo Scardine Jul 23 '12 at 1:13

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