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I was wondering are there any alternative or elegant way of writing if conditions, if there

are more conditions that has to be checked.

Example,

if(cond1){
   if(cond2){
      if(cond3){
         if(cond4){
            //all conditions are checked
             flag = true;
         }
      }
   }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use the logical AND operator.

if(cond1 && cond2 && cond3 && cond4) {
    flag = true;
}

It's equivalent in that if cond1 is false, the rest of the conditions are not evaluated, and so on.

In this case, it may be even simpler to just directly assign the value (inspired by Patrick's original answer):

flag = cond1 && cond2 && cond3 && cond4;
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1  
I just wanted to add that it is Short-Circuit Evaluation. false && anything is short-circuit evaluated to false without evaluating anything. true || anything is short-circuit evaluated to true. Also only boolean operators (&& ||) use this evaluation. Binary & or | are not using it. –  Pshemo Jul 23 '12 at 1:14
1  
@Pshemo Neither do boolean & and |. Your terminology is a bit confusing. It is the operator itself that is or isn't evaluated short-circuit: it has nothing to do with boolean or binary. –  EJP Jul 23 '12 at 2:01
    
@EJP You are right. I forgot that when & and | are used on boolean variables then they are not called binary operators. It's hard to focus and write nice comment at 4.00 am :/ –  Pshemo Jul 23 '12 at 2:16

A short readable, elegant way would be:

 flag = cond1 && cond2 && cond3 && cond4 ? true : false;

Or as pstanton says:

 boolean flag = cond1 && cond2 && cond3 && cond4;
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you could even remove the brackets. –  pstanton Jul 23 '12 at 1:09
3  
you could even remove the '? true : false;' –  pstanton Jul 23 '12 at 1:09

If less is more, this is THE most elegant:

boolean flag = cond1 && cond2 && cond3 && cond4;
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As ZongLi indicates, it's easy to reduce this to a set of ANDs, but this gets more complex when you have complex logic

if(cond1){
   if(cond2){
      if(cond3){
         if(cond4){
            //all conditions are checked
             flag = true;
         }
      }
      if(cond4){
         flag3 = true;
      }
   }
   else
      flag2 = true;
}

Now you have a situation where reducing this isn't as simple

flag1 = cond1 && cond2 && cond3 && cond4
flag2 = cond1 && cond2 && cond4
flag2 = cond1 && !cond2

Reducing these to their boolean expressions, though, often makes things less readable and maintainable, because it loses the semantic relationship between the variables. The example above might be rewritten as

if(cond1){
   if(cond2){
      if(cond4){
         flag3 = true;
         if(cond3){
             flag = true;
         }
      }
   }
   else
      flag2 = true;
}

or

if(cond1 && cond2){

      if(cond4){
         flag3 = true;
         if(cond3){
             flag = true;
         }
      }
}
else if(cond1){ flag2 = true; }

It's going to depend on the semantics of your code which is best, lots of nesting, though, suggests you might be better off using boolean expressions or restructuring your conditional tree.

It's useful to keep in mind boolean logical equivalences here, especially that IF x THEN y is logically equivalent to !X or Y

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