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I want to create a Queue which should not allow duplicate elements and I should be able to access elements of this queue based on index. Please let me know how should I implement this?

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1  
So it isn't a Queue at all. What precise access modes do you need? – EJP Jul 23 '12 at 3:41
    
It will be a queue and the consumers of this queue should be able to dequeue from it, but instead of removing the de-queued elements from queue I will set a flag in the element stored at that index – Anuj Mehta Jul 23 '12 at 3:48
    
I believe it is better to create a wrapper for an List (probably ArrayList'). With modifications to add` method to check for duplications. – Amir Pashazadeh Jul 23 '12 at 3:51
    
So it isn't a queue. It is a linear list, which is presumably appended to. Sounds like an ArrayList to me, with an existence check. – EJP Jul 23 '12 at 3:52
    
Afterthought: it is also a very bad design. Finding the next element to process will be O(N). Don't do this, unless you maintain the 'next' index separately. – EJP Jul 23 '12 at 4:38

Well it is clear that Java doesn't have the exact data structure matching your specification and requirement. The closest that can match your requirement is probably a LinkedHashSet. It is basically a Set (matching your unique items requirement) whose elements are kept in insertion-order (like a Queue) and to get an element by index you can use set.toArray() to get an array or create a list out of the set (however it will cost cost some extra memory).

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am planning to use ConcurrentLinkedQueue for my problem. Here is the sample code

import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentLinkedQueue;


public class FinalQueue {

    private ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String> queue;

    public FinalQueue()
    {
        queue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String>();
    }

    public synchronized void enqueue(String ipAddress)
    {
        if(!queue.contains(ipAddress))
            queue.add(ipAddress);
    }

    public String dequeue()
    {
        return queue.poll();
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return "" + queue;
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        FinalQueue queue = new FinalQueue();
        queue.enqueue("1.2.3.4");
        queue.enqueue("2.3.4.5");
        queue.enqueue("1.1.1.1");
        queue.enqueue("1.2.3.4");
        System.out.println(queue.toString());
        System.out.println("Dequeue..." + queue.dequeue());
        System.out.println("Dequeue..." + queue.dequeue());
        System.out.println(queue.toString());
    }
}
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You could always just use an ArrayList. It's good for accessing elements based on index and when adding elements you can always just check if the ArrayList contains the element to be added. My initial instinct was to use a Set for the disallowing of duplicates, but the elements are Sets are not indexed. If you can find a way to index the elements in Sets, then that would be my recommendation.

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In ArrayList while inserting each element I will need to scan the complete list to see if same entry exists or not. Should I do something like use 2 data structures - 1) A Map that contains a search key of my object and 2) An ArrayList that contains all the data – Anuj Mehta Jul 23 '12 at 3:44
    
Even with that you'd have to scan through the whole list to see if it's there. – jrad Jul 23 '12 at 3:47
    
I thought of using Map for finding out whether object is present or not. If object is not present then I will store the "Unique Field" of that object in Map and complete object in ArrayList. Will this be fine? – Anuj Mehta Jul 23 '12 at 3:50
    
Sorry, I don't really know what you mean. Could you elaborate a bit? – jrad Jul 23 '12 at 3:51
    
Suppose I want to store an instance of following class Employee { int empId, String name} Here the "Unique Field" will be "empId". Hence if I internally maintain a Map<Integer> which holds the "empId" of all objects and an ArrayList<Employee> which stores the actual object. Whenever I want to insert an object it's "empId" should be checked in Map. If not present then I can insert the object in ArrayList and the "empId" in Map – Anuj Mehta Jul 23 '12 at 3:56

Don't call it a queue because by definition a queue only is a first in first out data structure.

Depending upon your input values, i believe you should use an array and a hash function. The hash determines which index an element is located using its value and vice versa i.e. when given an index it returns the value contained in it.

Since you are using a hash, the repetition is avoided when a collision occurs i.e. you can check if a value previously existed in an index and if it's the same value or not.

C++ stl has a good class for set though java i don't think have one. But the point is set does not offer index based retrieval.

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