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I'm quite new to C# but I have quite good C++ knowledge. From C++ I'm used that something like this works:

class Base1 {};
class Derived1 : Base1 {};
class Base2 {
   Base1 foo();
};
class Derived2 {
   Derived1 foo();
};

which I know under the term Covariance. The piece of code might miss something but I hope you get what I want to say. As I tried to produce something like that in C# with override and stuff, the Compiler complained that the type had to be the same. like this:

class Base1 {};
class Derived1 : Base1 {};
class Base2 {
   Base1 foo();
};
class Derived2 {
   Base1 foo();
};

Might that lead to any problems? Of course as I am the programmer of function foo I can assure there will always be a Derived1 returned. But whoever calls my function doesn't know that.

I have a project in which I have some Manager classes, for which I wanted to use an Interface IManager (it's my own class, not any from .NET if there exists any with that name), because they all have to implement a method Load() for example. Load() always returns a an Object, that is managed by that certain Manager. If every Manager implements IManager, all of them would get the Interface

ManagableObject Load();

Is that good, bad? Or even better, is there any workaround?

I also read that it worked with templates, but only like this I guess:

List<Base1> myList;
myList.push_back(new Derived1());

Or can I use List as return type in Base1 and List in class Derived2? That would be ok too.

Thanks and best regards, Expecto

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There is nothing wrong with your first set of class definitions (apart from requiring method implementations) - so I think you might be missing something in your explanation. What compiler error do you get? –  RJ Lohan Jul 23 '12 at 5:08
    
C# actually supports covariance in various places; however covariant return values are not supported, which I believe is what you're after here. Your samples are also currently broken with regards to showing the actual problem. –  Cwan Jul 23 '12 at 5:55
    
@RJLohan in English it would be sth like: "The return value has to be ManagableObject to match the overwritten method IManager.Load()" –  ExpectoPatronum Jul 23 '12 at 9:28
    
@cwan yes, I meant the return value, but I thought I made that clear, sorry –  ExpectoPatronum Jul 23 '12 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

You need to declare your method using the new keyword.

 class Derived2 {
  new Derived1 foo();
};
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Use the new modifier to explicitly hide a member inherited from a base class. To hide an inherited member, declare it in the derived class using the same name, and modify it with the new modifier. (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) it used when class base { void test(){}} class derived:base{ new void test(){}} (new is used only to hide base method, without new keyword compiler produces only warning message but code is compilable and executable) –  ASpirin Jul 23 '12 at 6:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

That's what I meant: Does C# support return type covariance? but I didn't know to look for the term return type covariance

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