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i am stuck and unable to figure out why this is the following piece of code is not running .I am fairly new to c/c++.

#include <iostream>
int main(){
    const char *arr="Hello";
    const char * arr1="World";

    char **arr2=NULL;
    arr2[0]=arr;
    arr2[1]=arr1;

    for (int i=0;i<=1;i++){
        std::cout<<arr2[i]<<std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

where as this is running perfectly fine

#include <iostream>
int main(){

    const char *arr="Hello";
    const char * arr1="World";

    char *arr2[1];
    arr2[0]=arr;
    arr2[1]=arr1;

    for (int i=0;i<=1;i++){
        std::cout<<arr2[i]<<std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
} 

Why is this? and generally how to iterate over a char **? Thank You

share|improve this question
1  
It seems that you don't have a good grasp on how pointers work at all. From these lines: char **arr2=NULL; arr2[0]=arr; arr2[1]=arr1; – OmnipotentEntity Jul 23 '12 at 7:10
    
In the 2nd case, it is not working fine: You may have overwritten other variables on the stack. – nhahtdh Jul 23 '12 at 7:11
    
All of your problems go away if you stop using raw character arrays in C++ and use the string class instead. Add #include <string> to the top of your code file and replace all of that mess with std::string. – Cody Gray Jul 23 '12 at 7:16
    
@CodyGray I wanted to understand what really was happening. – Manoj I Jul 23 '12 at 7:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

char *arr2[1]; is an array with one element (allocated on the stack) of type "pointer to char". arr2[0] is the first element in that array. arr2[1] is undefined.

char **arr2=NULL; is a pointer to "pointer to char". Note that no memory is allocated on the stack. arr2[0] is undefined.

Bottom line, neither of your versions is correct. That the second variant is "running perfectly fine" is just a reminder that buggy code can appear to run correctly, until negligent programming really bites you later on and makes you waste hours and days in debugging because you trashed the stack.

Edit: Further "offenses" in the code:

  1. String literals are of type char const *, and don't you forget the const.
  2. It is common (and recommended) practice to indent the code of a function.
  3. It is (IMHO) good practice to add spaces in various places to increase readability (e.g. post (, pre ), pre and post binary operators, post ; in the for statement etc.). Tastes differ, and there is a vocal faction that actually encourages leaving out spaces wherever possible, but you didn't even do that consistently - and consistency is universially recommended. Try code reformatters like astyle and see what they can do for readability.
share|improve this answer
    
They're also not correct because character literals in C++ are const. Any decent compiler should be issuing a warning about that. – Cody Gray Jul 23 '12 at 7:17
    
@CodyGray: Actually I didn't look that far, and usually am too disappointed to even mention stuff like that (or the hideous code style of non-indention, non-spacing) in answers. That's like preaching to the deaf. – DevSolar Jul 23 '12 at 7:20
    
Exactly why I stopped writing an answer and +1'ed the one that just appeared with the important thing in bold. :-) – Cody Gray Jul 23 '12 at 7:51

This is not correct because arr2 does not point to anything:

char **arr2=NULL;
arr2[0]=arr;
arr2[1]=arr1;

correct way:

char *arr2[2] = { NULL };
arr2[0]=arr;
arr2[1]=arr1;

This is also wrong, arr2 has size 1:

char *arr2[1];
arr2[0]=arr;
arr2[1]=arr1;

correct way is the same:

char *arr2[2] = { NULL };
arr2[0]=arr;
arr2[1]=arr1;
share|improve this answer
char **arr2=NULL;

Is a pointer to a pointer that points to NULL while

char *arr2[1];

is an array of pointers with already allocated space for two items.

In the second case of the pointer to a pointer you are are trying to write data in a memory location that does not exist while in the first place the compiler has already allocated two slots of memory for the array so you can assign values to the two elements.

If you think of it very simplistically, a C pointer is nothing but an integer variable, whose value is actually a memory address. So by defining char *x = NULL you are actually defining a integer variable with value NULL (i.e zero). Now suppose you write something like *x = 5; This means go to the memory address that is stored inside x (NULL) and write 5 in it. Since there is no memory slot with address 0, the the entire statement fails.

To be honest it;s been ages since I last had to deal with such stuff however this little tutorial here, might clear the motions of array and pointers in C++.

share|improve this answer

Put simply the declaration of a pointer does NOT reserve any memory, where as the declration of a array doesn't.

In your first example Your line char **arr2=NULL declares a pointer to a pointer of characters but does not set it to any value - thus it is initiated pointing to the zero byte (NULL==0). When you say arr2[0]=something you are attempting to place a valuei nthis zero location which does not belong to you - thus the crash.

In your second example: The declaration *arr2[2] does reserve space for two pointers and thus it works.

share|improve this answer
1  
A declaration doesn't necessarily reserve any memory, but a definition does, and all of his declarations are definitions. The problem is he is having is that the definition of a pointer only creates an object with pointer type. Which he initializes with a null pointer---fine as far as that goes. His problem in the first case is that he's dereferencing a null pointer. – James Kanze Jul 23 '12 at 7:28

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