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I expect this code (calling a method of an anonymous class after using a pattern match on refined type)

(new {
    def foo : Unit = println("Called foo method")
} : Any) match {
    case f : {def foo : Unit} ⇒
        println("Has foo method")
        f.foo
}

to print

Has foo method
Called foo method

(as well as an unchecked warning).

I know the match always succeeds due to type erasure, but that shouldn't cause the problem, since the run-time type (even considering erasure) of f should be $anon$NameOfSomeAnonymousClassThatHasAfooMethod

When entered into the Scala REPL (2.9.1), it actually throws NoSuchMethodException:

<console>:11: warning: refinement AnyRef{def foo: Unit} in type pattern AnyRef{def foo: Unit} is unchecked since it is eliminated by erasure
              case f : {def foo : Unit} ⇒
                       ^
Has foo method
java.lang.NoSuchMethodException: $anon$1.foo()
        at java.lang.Class.getMethod(Class.java:1622)
        at .reflMethod$Method1(<console>:13)
        at .<init>(<console>:13)
        at .<clinit>(<console>:13)
        at .<init>(<console>:11)
        at .<clinit>(<console>)
        at $print(<console>)
        at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
        at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
        at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
        at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:616)
        at scala.tools.nsc.interpreter.IMain$ReadEvalPrint.call(IMain.scala:704)
        at scala.tools.nsc.interpreter.IMain$Request$$anonfun$14.apply(IMain.scala:920)
        at scala.tools.nsc.interpreter.Line$$anonfun$1.apply$mcV$sp(Line.scala:43)
        at scala.tools.nsc.io.package$$anon$2.run(package.scala:25)
        at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

Why?

Edit

It turns out the proximate cause is that foo is generated as private. I speculated about the cause of this in my answer, but I'm not sure. If you have an idea, still feel free to post it as an answer!

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stackoverflow.com/questions/3200301/… is not the cause because here foo is public. –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 8:03
    
Are you sure this is the name after any mangling? I would print all the getMethods to check. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 23 '12 at 8:05
2  
Not exactly welcome advice, I know, but I'd steer clear of structural types :-s –  oxbow_lakes Jul 23 '12 at 8:11
    
@PeterLawrey: If I use f.getClass.getMethods foreach println, it lists only the Object methods. But then why is it giving the wrong class? –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 8:20

3 Answers 3

I know the match always succeeds due to type erasure, but that shouldn't cause the problem, since the run-time type (even considering erasure) of f should be $anon$NameOfSomeAnonymousClassThatHasAfooMethod

It "should" in the sense that it's the obvious implementation and it's what you expect; it need not, and as you've found, it doesn't.

Pattern matching on a refinement is a blind cast. You have to have a lot of faith.

This is odd because Scala methods are supposed to be public by default.

Methods you declare in source are public by default. Implementation details are not.

I suspect the cause is that the compiler wrongly assumes that since the class is anonymous, its defined methods are uncallable from outside the class.

The compiler correctly assumes that you have to violate the terms of the arrangement to call any methods of the anonymous class directly. You cast your references and you takes your chances.

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But foo is a "method declared in source", not an implementation detail. –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 8:54
    
And if it were a bad cast, it would be a ClassCastException, not a NoSuchMethodException. –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 8:55
1  
And if the compiler determines that the code violates the terms of the arrangements, should that not be a compile-time error? –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 8:56
    
foo is not a member of any accessible class. I am not using "cast" in the strict sense of "jvm-level cast" but to say "you are overruling the compiler and you get what you get." And that's the answer to #3 as well. As soon as you cast, all bets are off. The compiler won't stop you. You can probably trust me on this stuff since I wrote a good percentage of the relevant code. –  extempore Jul 23 '12 at 9:02
1  
i vote for this to be considered a bug, NoSuchMethodException is not acceptable for statically typed language. if it can't be fixed, why would match on structural type be allowed at all? –  OlegYch Aug 1 '12 at 15:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Upon more investigation, I find that the method was somehow made private:

(new {
    def foo : Unit = println("Called foo method")
} : Any) match {
    case f : {def foo : Unit} ⇒
        println("Has foo method")
        f.getClass.getDeclaredMethods
}

prints res5: Array[java.lang.reflect.Method] = Array(private void $anon$1.foo()).

This is odd because Scala methods are supposed to be public by default.

As Edmondo1984 points out, it works (foo method is public) if you remove the : Any.

Speculatively

I suspect the cause is that the compiler wrongly assumes that since the class is anonymous and the instance is declared to be of another type, its defined methods are uncallable from outside the class. This assumption would be valid in Java, but not in a language that provides structural typing. It therefore generates them as private, in an overzealous application of the principle of information hiding. If so, this is either a compiler bug or a language design corner case (using anonymous functions together with structural typing).

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Actually, now I doubt this is the cause. If so, new {def foo = 123}.foo should fail, but actually it works as expected (returns 123). –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 8:56
1  
Have you tried removing the :Any ? –  Edmondo1984 Jul 23 '12 at 9:13
    
@Edmondo1984: And now foo is generated as public. That explains it. –  Mechanical snail Jul 23 '12 at 9:39

As I guessed in a comment, the problem is that if you upcast an anonymous class to Any, the compiler automatically restrict the visibility of the anonymously defined methods.

(new {
    def foo : Unit = println("Called foo method")
} ) match {
    case f : {def foo : Unit} ⇒
        println("Has foo method")
        f.getClass.getDeclaredMethods
}

By definition the methods which you create in an anonymous class not belonging to any of its superclass will be available only on the object you just created. If you however immediately upcast the object to Any, there will no type-safe instance of your anonymous class on which you will be able to safely invoke the method foo.

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