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Whats the worst piece of code you have come across?
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This mess reminded of some of the stuff I've had to work on. I was wondering if anyone else had nasty refactoring war stories and especially if you found unique or helpful solutions.

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marked as duplicate by bdukes, gnovice, Thomas Owens, Gavin Miller, joseph.ferris Jul 21 '09 at 18:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Link is broken. –  Finglas Jul 21 '09 at 18:28
    
This was tried before and shot down: stackoverflow.com/questions/268119/… –  gnovice Jul 21 '09 at 18:28
    
    
Bummer, I wanted to tell Bill my strategies for "how I dealt with" the awful code, but I can't, because this was dup'd out for earlier articles that did not even ask that question. I figured there was a reason why SO uses the term "exact duplicate"! –  Kevin Bourrillion Nov 5 '09 at 0:45
2  
Rather than closing an article, SO should be able to tag it with a tag that removes it from "Common" circulation but leaves it in a state where people who enjoy re-opening conversations, discussing things a little off-topic, etc. can still see them. It's often more helpful to answer questions and be involved in the discussions than to read a stale thread... but you give a nerd a little power and he will hold you to the letter of the law for no reason at all... Nature of nerds (remember Hall Monitors?) –  Bill K Nov 6 '09 at 18:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is actual code from some in-house Report Tracker software I got stuck maintaining. It is copied and pasted inline in ~40-50 pages (the whole app probably had <20 methods total when I found it, almost everything was inline logic). The code scared the shit out of me, so my solution was just to stick it in a function somewhere and call that. And this is actually how it is formatted.

if(trim($SearchOrder) != "")
    {
    $SearchArray = explode(",",$SearchOrder);
    if($ProductID != "" && !in_array("ProductID",$SearchArray))
    	$SearchOrder .= ",ProductID";
    if($TypeID != "" && !in_array("TypeID",$SearchArray))
    	$SearchOrder .= ",TypeID";
    if($CustomerID != "" && !in_array("CustomerID",$SearchArray))
    	$SearchOrder .= ",CustomerID";
    if($LocationID != "" && !in_array("LocationID",$SearchArray))
    	$SearchOrder .= ",LocationID";
    $SearchArray = explode(",",$SearchOrder);
    }
else
    {
    if($ProductID != "")
    	$SearchOrder = "ProductID";
    if($TypeID != "")
    	$SearchOrder = "TypeID";
    if($CustomerID != "")
    	$SearchOrder = "CustomerID";
    if($LocationID != "")
    	$SearchOrder = "LocationID";
    $SearchArray = array("$SearchOrder");
    }

    if($SearchOrder != "")
    	{
    		//Build Customer Products
    		if(in_array("CustomerID",$SearchArray))
    		{
    		$CSArray = array();
    		$res = mysql_query("select * from Locations where CustomerID='$CustomerID'");
    		while($LRow = mysql_fetch_object($res))
    			{
    			$LocSQL .= "LocationID = '$LRow->LocationID' || ";
    			}
    		if($LocSQL != "")
    			{
    			$LocSQL = "where " . $LocSQL . "1=0";
    			}
    		$CustomerIDList = BuildArray("select * from Products $LocSQL","ProductID","Serial");
    		}
    		//Build Location Products
    		if(in_array("LocationID",$SearchArray))
    		{
    		$LocationIDList = BuildArray("select * from Products where LocationID = '$LocationID'","ProductID","Serial");
    		}
    		//Build ProductType Products
    		if(in_array("TypeID",$SearchArray))
    		{
    		$TypeIDList = BuildArray("select * from Products where TypeID = '$TypeID'","ProductID","Serial");
    		}
    		//Build Serial Products
    		if(in_array("ProductID",$SearchArray))
    		{
    		$ProductIDList = BuildArray("select * from Products where ProductID = '$ProductID'","ProductID","Serial");
    		}

    	if(count($SearchArray) > 1)
    		{
    		$ExecStr = "";
    		foreach($SearchArray as $SearchItem)
    			{
    			$ExecStr .= "array_keys(\$$SearchItem" . "List),";
    			}
    		$ExecStr = "\$IntList = array_intersect(".(substr($ExecStr,0,strlen($ExecStr) -1)).");";
    		}
    	else
    		{
    		$ExecStr = "\$IntList = array_keys(\$".$SearchArray[0]."List);";
    		}
    	eval($ExecStr);
    	}
    	else
    		$IntList = array_keys(BuildArray("select * from Products","ProductID","Serial"));

//Build Product DropDowns
$ProdSQL = "";
foreach($IntList as $aProduct)
    {
    $ProdSQL .= "ProductID = '".substr($aProduct,2,strlen($aProduct))."' or ";
    }
$ProdSQL = "where $ProdSQL 1=0";
$ProductBox = array();
$TypeBox = array();
$LocationBox = array();
$CustomerBox = array();
$res = mysql_query("select * from Products $ProdSQL");

while($nProductRow = mysql_fetch_object($res))
    {
    ArrayPush($ProductBox,"ID".$nProductRow->ProductID,$nProductRow->Serial);
    if(!in_array("ID".$nProductRow->TypeID,$TypeBox))
    	{
    	$nTypeRow = DBGetRow("ProductTypes","TypeID",$nProductRow->TypeID);
    	ArrayPush($TypeBox,"ID".$nProductRow->TypeID,$nTypeRow->Name);
    	}
    if(!in_array("ID".$nProductRow->LocationID,$LocationBox))
    	{
    	$nLocationRow = DBGetRow("Locations","LocationID",$nProductRow->LocationID);
    	ArrayPush($LocationBox,"ID".$nProductRow->LocationID,$nLocationRow->Name);
    	if(!in_array("ID".$nLocationRow->LocationID,$CustomerBox))
    		{
    		$nCustomerRow =  DBGetRow("Customers","CustomerID",$nLocationRow->CustomerID);
    		ArrayPush($CustomerBox,"ID".$nLocationRow->CustomerID,$nCustomerRow->Name);
    		}
    	}
    }

It was after this application that I truly understood why some people despise PHP.

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2  
++ standard php code ;) –  Martin K. Jul 21 '09 at 18:36
    
Wow, that code is really inefficient! :o –  alexy13 Apr 12 '10 at 23:31
    
SQL injection city.... –  JoelFan Feb 28 '12 at 23:45

I started a job some years back and my first task was to refactor a switch statement.

No, I'm not kidding.

The switch statement was 25,000 lines long. Each of the about 40 cases duplicated, with slight variations, a data export process from the master database into a custom B2B transaction format.

Some cases output XML, some Excel, some plain text. Each had its own SELECT statement, each contained similar data-massaging functionality--and there was not a single comment anywhere.

The best part? The switch statement was invoked in a postback from a web page. No, there was no AJAX progress bar.

I still have nightmares. Hold me.

EDITED I forgot to add how I dealt with this: Several base classes and 40 derivations. Not in the same file. DataSets. And some comments. The result was an order of magnitude faster and required half as much code.

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smells like JSF –  Martin K. Jul 21 '09 at 18:37
    
In fact, ASP.NET and a C# codebehind! He shot himself in the foot 39 times. –  Ben M Jul 21 '09 at 18:42

To get things started, I had code from an overseas consulting code that looked like this:

for(int i=0;i<15;i++) {
    switch(i) {
    case 0:
        do stuff that operates on port 0
        there were like 4 lines of code here
        identical in each case statement except
        for the port number
        break;
    case 1:
        do stuff that operates on port 1
        there were like 4 lines of code here
        identical in each case statement except
        for the port number       
        break;

repeat for cases 2-15.

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2  
Ah, the infamous for-switch structure. The first time I heard of it was on The Daily WTF (thedailywtf.com/Articles/Switched_on_Loops.aspx). Then I got the wonderful opportunity to see this structure in three or four different production applications at work. That was not a very fun day. –  Welbog Jul 21 '09 at 18:31
    

It was C++ code that had a number of methods - each method had a very similar switch statement. The code was copied and pasted from each method and slightly modified by the previous developers.

The prior developer in the code fixed a defect in the code and had to touch every function and every case in the switches. Rather than refactor he just made all the edits.

I made just one method with some parameters that distinguished the differences. I think overall I was able to remove about 2000 lines of code. It was amazing.

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I had to do something similar with some check writing software written in a VB6 Class Module only I think it was on the order of 10k lines reduced to around 200. –  MyItchyChin Jul 21 '09 at 18:44

The most helpful thing I ever did was buy Michael Feathers' "Working Effectively with Legacy Code".

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The worst code was a 3-inch stack high printout (yes, we used to print out code then) of a Prolog interpreter written in C.

I wanted something more efficient than the usual AI Lisp query interpreters.

I refactored it into 3 pages of Lisp :) And it run much faster than the code I had been using previously, because it had some very sophisticated backtracking mechanisms.

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I try not to refactor old code just for the sake of it. My general rule is; only change things when there is a bug or feature request (that has been approved). Refactoring old code that you don't fully understand is more likely to break something. If I do decide to refactor something old, it must have a unit test to validate the change.

Defining the difference between old and new code is a bit harder though. We are constantly writing code, and of course I do want to refactor rubbish code that is still current. I try to keep a clear line between projects and refactoring for code readability should only occur in the current project.

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