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I have a cache class which stores a list into a dictionary:

public class CacheList<T>
{
    private Dictionary<UInt64, T> _cacheItems = new Dictionary<UInt64, T>();

    public IList<T> GetItems()
    {
        return new List<T>(_cacheItems.Values);
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        UInt64 key = (UInt64)(item.GetHashCode());

        if (!_cacheItems.ContainsKey(key))
            _cacheItems.Add(key, item);
    }
}

Now I am adding items to the dictionary by getting the Hashcode from the generic T. But I would like to specify which field / property I want to have as the key. Problem is it is a type T so it doesn't know which properties are in this item.

How would I access a property from a generic item?

share|improve this question
2  
This might be part of the quesiton, but: you shouldn't use a hash-code as a key (it isn't guaranteed unique), and there's no point storing an int as a ulong – Marc Gravell Jul 23 '12 at 8:19
    
why storing the items into dictionary and taking care about the key generation, why not using another structure like HashSet<T>? because the way you're generating the key, you'll have to supply the item to generate the key to find the item at the dictionary. – Tamir Jul 23 '12 at 8:23
    
@marc, thanks for your comments, but this was just a quick test to show my problem :) – YesMan85 Jul 23 '12 at 9:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe:

public class CacheList<T, TKey>
{
    private readonly Dictionary<TKey, T> _cacheItems = new Dictionary<TKey, T>();
    private readonly Func<T, TKey> selector;
    public CacheList(Func<T, TKey> selector)
    {
        this.selector = selector;
    }
    public IList<T> GetItems()
    {
        return new List<T>(_cacheItems.Values);
    }

    public bool Add(T item)
    {
        TKey key = selector(item);

        if (_cacheItems.ContainsKey(key)) { return false; }

        _cacheItems.Add(key, item);
        return true;
    }
    public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out T value)
    {
        return _cacheItems.TryGetValue(key, out value);
    }
}

Then:

var dict = new CacheList<Customer,int>(c => c.CustomerId);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 That's pretty cool, means they don't have to bugger about making interfaces if they need the key to change. – Adam Houldsworth Jul 23 '12 at 8:23
    
You beat me to an identical solution by less than 60 seconds. Grrr. On the plus side, it must be an awfully good answer. ;-) – Enigmativity Jul 23 '12 at 8:27
    
Exactly what I was looking for! – YesMan85 Jul 23 '12 at 10:00

You could use a lambda function to specify the key. Something like this:

public class CacheList<T, P>
{
    private Dictionary<P, T> _cacheItems = new Dictionary<P, T>();
    private Func<T, P> _getKey;

    public CacheList(Func<T, P> getKey)
    {
        _getKey = getKey;
    }

    public IList<T> GetItems()
    {
        return new List<T>(_cacheItems.Values);
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        P key = _getKey(item);

        if (!_cacheItems.ContainsKey(key))
            _cacheItems.Add(key, item);
    }
}

You would then create the instance like this:

var cl = new CacheList<MyClass, string>(x => x.SomeProperty);

Does this work for you?

share|improve this answer
    
This works yes thank you! But I went for Marc Gravell's answer because of the TKey. – YesMan85 Jul 23 '12 at 10:00

I saw the generics and thought "constraints", but in hindsight I much prefer Marc's approach, so I'd go his route.

You could create an interface that exposes the property you need then constrain on that interface:

interface IExposeKey
{
    string Key { get; }
}

public class CacheList<T> where T : IExposeKey { }

In code, the compiler can now assume T is IExposeKey so can offer up strongly-typed access accordingly:

public void Add(T item)
{
    string key = item.Key;

    if (!_cacheItems.ContainsKey(key))
        _cacheItems.Add(key, item);
}

You could even expose the property name in this manner to then use reflection on the T instance, but you open the door for runtime errors.

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