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I am developing a program that can send http requests to fetch documents. I have fill a queue with all the requests items:

Queue<RequestItem> requestItems = buildRequest4Docs();

Then,

int threadNum = requestItems.size();
        //ExecutorService exs = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(threadNum);

        for (int i = 0; i < threadNum; i++) {
            ResponseInterface response = new CMSGOResponse();
            RequestTask task = new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response);
            task.run();
            //exs.execute(new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response));
        }
        //exs.shutdown();

I am confused here, in the for loop,does the tasks run simultaneously? Or the tasks run one by one?

Thanks!

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The class "RequestTask" implements "Runable" –  zxi Jul 23 '12 at 9:18
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the way you got it now the tasks will be executed one by one. If you uncomment the code you got now as comments and comment the lines RequestTask task = new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response); and task.run(); you will get a concurrent execution.

So for the concurrent execution it has to look like this:

int threadNum = requestItems.size();
ExecutorService exs = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(threadNum);

for (int i = 0; i < threadNum; i++) {
    ResponseInterface response = new CMSGOResponse();
    exs.execute(new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response));
}
exs.shutdown();
while (! exs.isTerminated()) {
    try {
        exs.awaitTermination(1L, TimeUnit.DAYS);
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // you may or may not care here, but if you truly want to
        // wait for the pool to shutdown, just ignore the exception
        // otherwise you'll have to deal with the exception and
        // make a decision to drop out of the loop or something else.
    }
}

In addition to that I suggest, that you do not bind the amount of threads created with the ExecutorService to the amount of task you got to work. Connecting it to the amount of processors of the host system is usually a better method. To get the amount of processors use: Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors()

And in the executor service initialized like this you put the items of your queue. But that works nicely without fetching the total size, rather by polling the Queue until it does not return additional data.

The final result of my proposals could look like this:

final int threadNum = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
final ExecutorService exs = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(threadNum);

while (true) {
    final RequestItem requestItem = requestItems.poll();
    if (requestItem == null) {
        break;
    }
    final ResponseInterface response = new CMSGOResponse(); 
    exs.execute(new RequestTask(requestItem , this, response));
}
exs.shutdown();
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I would suggest the ExecutorService pool size configuration is more complex than the above. I would configure the number of threads dependent on what they're doing and what they're resource-bound by, rather than simply the number of CPUs (e.g what happens if the RequestTask is querying a remote service) –  Brian Agnew Jul 23 '12 at 9:21
    
That is dependent on the amount of tasks to be expected. But its a bad idea to set the amount of threads to the amount of tasks. What will happen if we got like 1000 tasks waiting at this point? Problems are likely to happen in this case. The method above will work, it won't be the most efficient method around, because the construction of threads are usually pretty expensive. If you want a very efficient solution you have to scale the amount of threads to the amount of tasks and the amount of processors. Also you have to consider not using threads at all in case there are just a few tasks. –  Nitram Jul 23 '12 at 9:25
    
If there are 10 tasks and 2 CPUs, in the code above,how the 10 tasks assigned to 2 threads? In each thread,will the tasks run sequentially? I mean if java can arrange the tasks to idle thread rightly automatically?@Nitram –  zxi Jul 23 '12 at 10:00
    
I checked the JavaDoc in question and was unable to find any information in regards of the order how the tasks are executed. So I guess the order is not defined. The tasks are placed on the worker threads as the threads finish tasks. So once a thread is free, another task is started on this thread, in case there are tasks left. Also exs.shutdown(); does not block the execution until all tasks have finished. You need to use exs.awaitTermination(...) for this. See the javadoc for further informations: link –  Nitram Jul 23 '12 at 10:40
1  
There is no guarantee of the order of execution of the tasks. You'd have to do this yourself with locks and so forth. And i agree that this needs an awaitTermination call after the shutdown(). Shutdown returns immediately and does not wait for things to finish up. –  Matt Jul 23 '12 at 13:06
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I am confused here, in the for loop,does the tasks run simultaneously? Or the tasks run one by one?

With the code you've posted, they'll run one-by-one, because (assuming RequestTask is a subclass of Thread) you've called run. You should call start. Now that you've said RequestTask implements Runnable, the correct code wouldn't call start (it doesn't have one!) but rather new Thread(task);. (But it looks like you've now received a good answer regarding the ExecutorService, which is another way to do it.)

Assuming you call start start them on different threads instead, then yes, they'll all run in parallel (as much as they can on the hardware, etc.).

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Currently you are running your thread sequentially, Well you have two ways to run threads.(Assuming that RequestTask extends Thread)

I.Either create thread object and call start() method.

RequestTask task = new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response);
task.start(); // run() method will be called, you don't need to call it

II.Or create ExecutorService

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(poolSize);
//....
for (int i = 0; i < threadNum; i++) {
    ResponseInterface response = new CMSGOResponse();
    RequestTask task = new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response);
    pool.execute(task);
}
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You are running them one by one in the current thread. You need to use the ExecutorService to run them concurrently.

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I am confused here, in the for loop,does the tasks run simultaneously? Or the tasks run one by one?

Task will be executed in the same thread i.e. one by one since you are calling run() rather that start , it will not run the task in new thread .

        int threadNum = requestItems.size();
        ExecutorService exs = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(threadNum);


        ResponseInterface response = new CMSGOResponse();
        RequestTask task = new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, response);

        exs.execute(task );        
        exs.shutdown();

In above case task will be executed in new thread and as soon as you assign 10 different task to ExecutorService they will be executed asynchronously in different threads.

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I usually tend to create my Threads (or classes implementing Interface), THEN launch them with the start() method.

In your case, since RequestTask implements Runnable, you could add a start() method like this :

public class RequestTask implements Runnable {
    Thread t;
    boolean running;

    public RequestTask() {
        t = new Thread(this);
    }

    public void start() {
        running = true;    // you could use a setter
        t.start();
    }

    public void run() {
        while (running) {
            // your code goes here
        }
    }
}

, then :

int threadNum = requestItems.size();
RequestTask[] rta = new RequestTask[threadNum];

// Create the so-called Threads ...
for (int i=0;i<threadNum;i++) {
    rta[i] = new RequestTask(requestItems.poll(), this, new CMSGOResponse());
}

// ... THEN launch them
for (int i=0;i<threadNum;i++) {
    rta[i].start();
}
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