Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking in some puzzles for threads and I can't figure out why the following consistently prints 999999:

class Job extends Thread {  
    private Integer number = 0;  
    public void run() {  
        for (int i = 1; i < 1000000; i++) {  
            number++;  
        }  
    }  
    public Integer getNumber() {  
        return number;  
    }  
}  
public class Test {  
    public static void main(String[] args)   
    throws InterruptedException {  
        Job thread = new Job();  
        thread.start(); 
        synchronized (thread) {  
            thread.wait();  
        }  
        System.out.println(thread.getNumber());  
    }  
}   

There is no notify on the same lock (and spurious wakeup seem to be ignored).
If a thread finishes does a notify get signalled or something?
How come main prints the result and not get "stuck" waiting?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

In the Javadoc for Java 7 Thread.join(long)

This implementation uses a loop of this.wait calls conditioned on this.isAlive. As a thread terminates the this.notifyAll method is invoked. It is recommended that applications not use wait, notify, or notifyAll on Thread instances.

Using a Thread directly this way is considered bad practical. Note: wait() could end for any number of reasons, possibly spuriously.


Based on a puzzler related to @Voo's comment. The point is you shouldn't play with the internal behaviour of Thread as this is more likely to lead to confusion.

public static String getName() {
    return "MyProgram";
}
public static void main(String... args) {
    new Thread() {
       public void run() {
           System.out.println("My program is " + getName());
        }
    }.start();
}

What does this program print?

share|improve this answer
2  
Interesting... that's been added recently, it's not in my Java 6 source –  artbristol Jul 23 '12 at 9:35
    
Added a note this is from Java 7. AFAIK, all the previous versions did this. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 23 '12 at 9:38
    
Yep that was already a puzzle in Java puzzlers so it's at least been there since Java5. Really just never make an anonymous thread and avoid these problems. –  Voo Jul 23 '12 at 9:51
    
@Voo added a puzzler on this topic. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 23 '12 at 10:01
    
@PeterLawrey: I don't think that puzzle helps regarding the question. The question is not about ambiguous method names but about who calls notifyAll in a secret way. –  A.H. Jul 23 '12 at 10:28

For clarification, I have modified your code to this:

Job thread = new Job();
thread.start();
final Object lock = new Object();
synchronized (lock) { lock.wait(); }
System.out.println(thread.getNumber());

Now it blocks. That's a first-hand confirmation of what @Nitram has explained in his answer. If you care to have a look at the Thread implementation code, it will be quite obvious why this is the observed behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
So that is equivalent to a notify?But Job did not held any locks –  Cratylus Jul 23 '12 at 9:16
    
While you are waiting, the lock on that monitor is realeased, anyway I don't understand what you mean here –  Cratylus Jul 23 '12 at 9:20
2  
I don't see that this answers the question. Why does the first thread return from wait when the second thread terminates? –  David Schwartz Jul 23 '12 at 9:24
1  
@MarkoTopolnik: Yes, but where does Job hold any locks? Not in the visible code. –  A.H. Jul 23 '12 at 9:27
2  
"That's a first-hand confirmation" - the OP confirmed it in the first place. The question is "why", and is still unanswered. –  npe Jul 23 '12 at 9:28

Simply put a Thread notifies all waiting threads once the execution of the threads ends. Its not the proposed why to do this, but it works. To synchronize on the end of a thread rather use Thread.join.

share|improve this answer
1  
but it works You mean you don't have a doc for this, but it is something that you have observed as a behavior? –  Cratylus Jul 23 '12 at 9:24
    
Yes it works, because the dying thread will release the lock that was applied using Object.wait. But wait will also be released in case you use notify. If you want to be sure that you synchronize on the end of a thread you have to use Thread.join. –  Nitram Jul 23 '12 at 9:27
    
The question is not about how and whether the lock is released. The question is about how and whether the object will be signalled, causing wait to return. –  David Schwartz Jul 23 '12 at 9:28
    
Nitram, this is not about releasing any locks, as indeed none are held by either thread. This is about Thread using this for its own purposes, which is really a design fail. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 23 '12 at 9:28

NOTE: This answer has been edited extensively.


The reason for this behaviour is, that "someone" is calling notifyAll internally. This "someone" is the JVM itself as you can "see" in the C sources here:

http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk7/hotspot/hotspot/file/f95d63e2154a/src/share/vm/runtime/thread.cpp

In line 1531 the method ensure_join calls notifyAll. This is the counterpart to the wait calls in java.lang.Thread#join (as noted by Marko and others).

ensure_join in turn is called in line 1664 in the method JavaThread::exit.


Since this is "internal bookkeeping" nobody should rely on this behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
This is an example of what the Java implementors learned from experience to be bad design---using monitors of publicly accessible objects for internal purposes. See also the flip-side of your code paste. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 23 '12 at 9:30
    
notifyAll is called on the monitor of the threadGroup, not on the thread. –  tibtof Jul 23 '12 at 9:46
    
@tibtof: Right you are. Sorry. –  A.H. Jul 23 '12 at 9:52

A thread object is automatically notified when the thread finishes, that's why the main thread doesn't get stuck.

share|improve this answer
4  
Any source to back this? I haven't found anything on this in Javadocs. –  npe Jul 23 '12 at 9:18
    
@npe Peter already answered this. –  tibtof Jul 23 '12 at 9:48

Well....notify serves purpose of premature notifying to the threads waiting on the locked object. if you don't use Notify ,then certainly when it finishes it releases lock.

So that is equivalent to notify

no it's not..Consider the situation below.

class Job extends Thread {  
    private Integer number = 0;  
    public void run() {

       synchronized(this) {
       for (int i = 1; i < 1000000; i++) {  
            number++;  
        }  
        notify();     //releases lock here and your main thread continues
        do sumthing...
        do sumthing...
        }  
    }
    public Integer getNumber() {  
        return number;  
    }  
}  

if you don't use notify() ...lock will be released only after you do all your sumthings..

share|improve this answer
1  
Huh?! notify doesn't release any locks. –  David Schwartz Jul 23 '12 at 9:22
    
Your code will throw an exception at runtime as you are calling a notify without owning a lock –  Cratylus Jul 23 '12 at 9:25
    
m sorry guyz..that I forgot.. –  Ahmad Jul 23 '12 at 9:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.