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import os

def getName(AAPTLocation, apkFile):

    AAPTLocation = AAPTLocation.replace('\\','\\\\')
    apkFile = apkFile.replace('\\','\\\\')
    pname = ''
    cmd = ' \"\"' + AAPTLocation + '\" dump badging \"' + apkFile + '\"\"'
    p = os.popen(cmd)
    while 1:
        s = p.readline()
        if s:
            print s
            if s.find('package') != -1 and s.find('name') != -1:
                pname = s  
        if not s:
            break
    p.close()
    return pname

AAPTLocation = 'C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools\aapt.exe'
apkFile = 'C:\APKs\test.apk'
print getName(AAPTLocation, apkFile)

I need to run aapt.exe, get the package name of the apk and parse the result.

Running "C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools\aapt.exe" dump badging "C:\APKs\test.apk" directly in the commandline interface is working fine. However in the python script I pasted above it doesn't give me anything.

I already tried escaping the backslash but it doesn't make a difference at all. Is there something wrong with my code?.

share|improve this question
    
It's recommended to use the subprocess module rather than popen. Especially on Windows. –  Keith Jul 23 '12 at 9:27
    
It's reccomended not to use Windows at all. –  Rik Poggi Jul 23 '12 at 9:32
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to double the slashes in the python literal, they are being interpreted as the start of an escape code otherwise:

>>> 'C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools\aapt.exe'
'C:\\Program Files\\Android\x07ndroid-sdk\\platform-tools\x07apt.exe'
>>> 'C:\\Program Files\\Android\\android-sdk\\platform-tools\\aapt.exe'
'C:\\Program Files\\Android\\android-sdk\\platform-tools\\aapt.exe'
>>> print 'C:\\Program Files\\Android\\android-sdk\\platform-tools\\aapt.exe'
C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools\aapt.exe

Notice how in the first example (from your code) python has interpreted the \a entries as a hex 07 character instead, the ASCII code for BELL.

The alterative is to use a raw python string literal, by prefixing it with the letter r:

>>> r'C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools\aapt.exe'
'C:\\Program Files\\Android\\android-sdk\\platform-tools\\aapt.exe'

See the string literals documentation for more info on how string escapes work in string literals.

share|improve this answer
    
or use r'C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools\aapt.exe' (the r is not a typo) –  Danny Milosavljevic Jul 23 '12 at 10:15
    
@DannyMilosavljevic: yup, expanded. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 23 '12 at 10:20
    
@MartijnPieters thank you very much! :) it's now working. however in the documentation it says string prefix works in string literals. It doesn't mention anything about string prefix being used in a variable. Let's say for example AAPTLocation is a variable, adding r will not change it's value. Does python have a way to interpret backslash escape sequences in string variables? –  srh snl Jul 25 '12 at 2:36
    
@DannyMilosavljevic thank you very much! :) it's now working. however in the documentation it says string prefix works in string literals. It doesn't mention anything about string prefix being used in a variable. Let's say for example AAPTLocation is a variable, adding r will not change it's value. Does python have a way to interpret backslash escape sequences in string variables? –  srh snl Jul 25 '12 at 2:37
    
please disregard my question. i put the path in the config, read that config, get the value and put it in a variable, I didn't have to escape the backslash. perhaps python already did that part. Thanks everyone! :) –  srh snl Jul 25 '12 at 4:23
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