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Which approach would be better between the following two? I have chosen enums since, in the typical case subtype polymorphishm is the best approach; also this is a typical approach when writing a simple factory method.

public class SomeClass {
    public SomeEnum returnAType(String someString) {
        //implementation bellow
   }

   private boolean method1() {
   //...
   }

   private boolean method2() {
   //...
   }

   private boolean method3() {
   //...
   }

}

The first implementation of returnATypeMethod; this is faster since it does not call method2 and method3 (and possibly more) if method1 is valid.

    public SomeEnum returnAType(String someString) {
        if(method1(someString)) {
            SomeEnum.ENUM1.doSomething();
            return SomeEnum.ENUM1;
        }
        if(method2(someString)) {
            SomeEnum.ENUM2.doSomething();
            return SomeEnum.ENUM2;
        }
        if(method3(someString)) {
            SomeEnum.ENUM3.doSomething();
            return SomeEnum.ENUM3;
        }
        SomeEnum.DEFAULT_ENUM.doSomething();
        return SomeEnum.DEFAULT_ENUM;
   }

The second implementation of returnATypeMethod; this is more clear and no code duplicate:

    public SomeEnum returnAType(String someString) {
        SomeEnum enumType = SomeEnum.DEFAULT_ENUM;
        if(method1(someString)) {
            enumType = SomeEnum.ENUM1;
        }
        if(method2(someString)) {
            enumType = SomeEnum.ENUM2;            }
        }
        if(method3(someString)) {
            enumType = SomeEnum.ENUM3;
        }
        enumType.doSomething();
        return enumType;
   }
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1  
What if method1 and method2 and method3 is true? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 23 '12 at 9:39
    
excellent observation –  Edmondo1984 Jul 23 '12 at 9:40
    
If the return approach is selected then the first is considered; if not, the last one. With an if-else approach (as those suggested bellow) it's like with return - the first is selected. –  m3th0dman Jul 24 '12 at 8:29
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would be tempted to use

public SomeEnum returnAType(String someString) {
    SomeEnum enumType = method1(someString) ? SomeEnum.ENUM1 :
                        method2(someString) ? SomeEnum.ENUM2 :
                        method3(someString) ? SomeEnum.ENUM3 : SomeEnum.DEFAULT_ENUM;
    enumType.doSomething();
    return enumType;

}

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I find Java enums very confusing, and in general I would suggest to Try to avoid enums when you are not simply enumerating. You can organize your code into an interface or an abstract class and several singletons implementing that interface or abstract class. The final design is much cleaner and more understandable.

I warmly suggest to try to avoid a method which returns T and also calls t.someMethod inside. This pattern is confusing and misleading again. Think your returnAType as a factory method for your singletons, the goal of this function is only to return you the right type of singleton

If your function does not use some patterns but simple equalities, use a data structure to store the key-value association. Not EnumMap as someone said, because in EnumMap the Enum is the key, not the value.

In fact, a comment you received by @Peter Lawrey underlined the problem you get if you do not follow the second suggestion: don't write a method which returns t and also produces sides effects through t. My suggestion is to partially follow its advice, but move the side effect outside in this way:

// Beautiful and testable with no side-effects

public SomeEnum returnAType(String someString) {
    SomeEnum enumType = method1(someString) ? SomeEnum.ENUM1 :
                        method2(someString) ? SomeEnum.ENUM2 :
                        method3(someString) ? SomeEnum.ENUM3 : SomeEnum.DEFAULT_ENUM;

    return enumType;
}

// Do something for real
public void doSomethingWith(String someString) {
    SomeEnum enumType = returnAType(someString);
    enumType.doSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
How exactly are Enums confusing? –  Matt Jul 23 '12 at 12:50
    
Enumerations are very good for things who can assume values in a discrete, enumerable set, however in my personal experience they tend to mislead the design and bring people to write code full of switchs and if (because they are enums) . If they are replaced by a class hierarchy and a proper usage of polymorphism and other design patterns such as factory methods, the final design is normally cleaner. –  Edmondo1984 Jul 23 '12 at 13:03
    
Except for the headache of writing your own usertype objects for hibernate, and other situations where it's a pain to switch actual implementation objects. Plus if you really need to, you can add behavior to enum objects (which i wouldn't do unless you really need to, but it can be done). See this pastebin: pastebin.com/5cRAHY5R –  Matt Jul 23 '12 at 18:16
    
Ah I thought Hibernate was some 10-years technology which you only read about in textbooks and people have understood ORM are dangerous and harmful :) –  Edmondo1984 Jul 24 '12 at 7:06
    
@Edmondo1984: When using enums, you do not have to write lots of if-else; you only have to write them when initializing which is the same as in a typical factory method. In other cases you iterate over Enum.values() and do the operation on all the types. –  m3th0dman Jul 24 '12 at 8:27
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In Java 7 you can use switch with String :

Class SomeEnum elsewhere with Constructor SomeEnum(Integer) {..;}.

It can be private as in Pattern.class example, so it would be return SomeEnum.set(1);.

public SomeEnum returnAType(final String someString) {
     switch (someString.toLowerCase()) { //toLowerCase() if needed
        case "one":
            return new SomeEnum(1);
            break;
        case "two":
            return new SomeEnum(2);
            break;
        case "three":
            return new SomeEnum(3);
            break;
        default: 
            return new SomeEnum(-1); // or zero or Integer.[MIN|MAX]_VALUE
            break;
      }
}

Then you can use SomeEnum as you want.

Some model does not like intermediate returns so, you can add a temporary SomeEnum inside and return it at the end.

With typeOf SomeEnum is enum

public SomeEnum returnAType(final String someString) {
     switch (someString.toLowerCase()) { //toLowerCase() if needed
        case "one":
            return SomeEnum.ENUM1;
            // break; // Normaly break; is unused, you can  remove it
        case "two":
            return SomeEnum.ENUM2;
        case "three":
            return SomeEnum.ENUM3;
        default: 
            return SomeEnum.DEFAULT_ENUM; 
      }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Class SomeEnum it's actually an enum; you do not have public constructor. –  m3th0dman Jul 24 '12 at 8:28
    
@m3th0dman correction added –  cl-r Jul 24 '12 at 9:43
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