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What's your opinion in handling exceptions within a thread's execution? More specifically, what if the exception is thrown inside catch block of an try-catch clause? And what happen to the thread if the exception is unhandled?

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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What's your opinion in handling exceptions within a thread's execution?

You should handle exceptions whenever possible and whenever you expect exceptions. Clarification: I totally agree with John that you should not handle exceptions everywhere - only where you can do something about them. However, you should never let an exception go unhandled in a thread as this will cause serious problems. Have a root exception handler and let your thread die gracefully (after logging the problem etc...)

More specifically, what if the thread is thrown inside catch block of an try-catch clause?

Did you mean: What if the exception is thrown within the catch block? Well, then it goes unhandled by the current try-catch block. It's best not to put too much processing in a catch block to avoid this situation as much as possible.

And what happen to the thread if the the the thread is unhandled?

Did you mean: What happens to the thread if the exception is unhandled? It dies.

And as Ben mentioned:

An uncaught exception in a thread triggers an UnhandledException in the thread's AppDomain. You can watch for these by adding an event handler:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += CurrentDomain_UnhandledException;
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thanks for catching the typo –  weilin8 Jul 21 '09 at 18:57
    
@rein: not only the thread dies; it takes down the full process. –  Fredrik Mörk Jul 21 '09 at 18:59
    
I'd recommend somehow incorporating the information in Ben's answer into your last statement. The thread does die if there's an unhandled exception, but it doesn't stop there. The exception will propagate up the chain to the AppDomain and kill your app if you don't have another handler for it. –  jasonh Jul 21 '09 at 18:59
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I have to disagree with ren, or at least with what it sounds like he meant.

Only handle exceptions if you can actually handle them. Only if you can do something about what went wrong, or add information. Don't handle them just because you can.

try {
    // ..
} catch (Exception ex) {
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
}

The above is very bad. First, you don't display the entire exception, but only the Message. Second, you let things continue, and you don't know what state the process is in.

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Agreed. I didn't want to imply that there should be try-catch blocks around every bit of code. Thanks for catching that. –  rein Jul 21 '09 at 19:06
    
I totally agree. The tone of rein's answer (although he clarified he didn't mean to imply this) could be for beginners that writing try-catch blocks is a good thing. I would say, try to write code exception-safe, with as little try-catch blocks as possible; and only then start caring about exceptions that you can actually handle in very specific cases. Only at the top level of your application (and possibly the main boundaries of your application layers), care about catching all exceptions (for reporting & gracefully letting your app die) –  jeroenh Jul 21 '09 at 21:15
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An uncaught exception in a thread triggers an UnhandledException in the thread's AppDomain. You can watch for these by adding an event handler:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += CurrentDomain_UnhandledException;

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Note though that you cannon "handle" the exception in the traditional sense. After this event handler has been executed, the AppDomain is likely do die. This use of this event is mostly to be able log information about exception or similar actions. –  Fredrik Mörk Jul 21 '09 at 19:06
    
Yes--I should have mentioned that. –  Ben M Jul 21 '09 at 19:07
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Unhandled exceptions in a thread cause your process to die, and die with an unhelpful message in your event log.

Having top level exception handlers in every thread that log (and maybe re-throw) is a good practice, as is installing an appdomain exception handler as the other responses mention.

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If you think you can handle an exception, you should catch it. All other exceptions that can not be dealt with should bubble up to the surface of the stack where if along the way no appropriate handler is found, will let the thread die.

You should not write any code in a catch block that could throw another exception, but if you need to you could nest another try catch block around it.

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The .net exception mechanisms fundamentally do not provide any good way to handle an exception occurs during the execution of a catch block, or during the execution of a "finally" block while another exception is pending. Proper handling would require that .net support a composite exception type which could be caught by "catch" blocks for any of its constituents, but which would be automatically rethrown up the call stack until all constituent parts had been dealt with. Unfortunately, .net doesn't provide any such composite exception types; while one could define and use custom types in such a way as to obtain such semantics, the code for using them would be rather ugly, and they wouldn't integrate well with exceptions other code might throw.

Consequently, one is faced with a choice: stifle the new exception and let the old one propagate, let the new one propagate and lose the old one, or make a composite exception object which can only be handled by code that knows to look for it. None of those are particularly pleasant choices. Which one is best will depend upon an understanding of conditions what the different exception types represent, and what calling code will expect to do with them.

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