Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to do the following:

class sig
{
public:

int p_list[4];
}

sig :: sig()
{
p_list[4] = {A, B, C, D};
}

I get an error

missing expression in the constructor.

So how do I initilalise an array?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In C++11 only:

class sig
{
    int p_list[4];
    sig() : p_list { 1, 2, 3, 4 }   {   }
};

Pre-11 it was not possible to initialize arrays other than automatic and static ones at block scope or static ones at namespace scope.

share|improve this answer
    
I have C++10. So I had to do it hard way. Thanks for all your replies. –  chintan s Jul 23 '12 at 10:23

So how do I initilalise an array?

Using the normal initialiser list syntax:

sig::sig() : p_list{1, 2, 3, 4}
{ }

Note, this only works in C++11. Before that, you need to use a boost::array an initialise it inside a function.

share|improve this answer

If your compiler doesn't support C++11 initialization, then you have to assign each field separatly:

p_list[0] = A;
p_list[1] = B;
p_list[2] = C;
p_list[3] = D;
share|improve this answer

If your current compiler doesn't yet support C++11, you can initialize the vector contents using standard algorithms and functors:

class sig
{
public:
    sig()
    {
        struct Functor
        {
            Functor() : value(0) {};
            int operator ()() { return value++; };
            int value;
        };
        std::generate(p_list, p_list + 4, Functor());
    }

    int p_list[4];
};

Previous snippet example here.

Yes, is kind of ugly (at least, it looks ugly for me) and doesn't do the work at compile time; but it does the work that you need in the constructor.

If you need some other kind of initialization (initialization with even/odd numbers, initialization with random values, start with anoter value, etc...) you only need to change the Functor, and this is the only advantage of this ugly approach.

share|improve this answer
p_list[4] = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D'};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.