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I have a question in a exam and I am given the following question:-

What is the meaning of line 4(what happen in line 4?)

1    char i , *p;
2    i=65;
3    p=&i;
4    p=(char*)66;
5    (*p)++;

Could someone please help?

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Aug 13 '12 at 1:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What is your thoughts on what it does? –  John Mitchell Jul 23 '12 at 11:04
9  
Are you taking the exam right now? :-) –  Frerich Raabe Jul 23 '12 at 11:05
1  
Casting integer to a pointer? No thanks. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jul 23 '12 at 11:05
2  
It's just an assignment. The next line would be interesting, though. –  nhahtdh Jul 23 '12 at 11:06

6 Answers 6

Have a look at This tutorial which gives some nice information on pointers. I don't want to tell you exactly what it does since it would not teach anything but rather give you a parrot fashion answer and you'd be stumped on the next question like this.

The area you want to be looking for though is casting and pointers.

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"66" will be cast to (char *) type

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p=(char*)66; casts address 66 in memory to a pointer and then increments it on the following line. As-is, this code probably won't work, unless you happen have privileges to write to byte 66 in RAM.

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Since p is a pointer (to char in this case), it holds an address. Line 4 simply writes the address 66 to p. After the line is executed, p points to the adress 66. Whether this is a valid address is a different issue.

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I fixed line 4 in order to make the code sensible.

1    char i , *p;
2    i=65;
3    p=&i;
4    *p=(char)66;
5    (*p)++;
  • In line 1, you have a char i and a pointer to char p.

  • In line 2, i holds the value 65, which is the letter 'A' in ASCII.

  • in line 3, p points to the address of i.

  • In line 4, the value in the address that p points to is 66, which is the letter B in ASCII. Since p points to the address of i, then i also has a value of 66.

  • In line 5, the value in the address that p points to is increased from 66 to 67, which makes it the letter C in ASCII.

If you print i or *p you'll get the letter 'C'.

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1  
ITYM line 4 to be *p = (char) 66; –  Happy Green Kid Naps Jul 23 '12 at 15:58
    
right, fixed it. –  Avi Cohen Jul 23 '12 at 17:56

I find when learning a programming language, that learning how to say it out loud helps one understand what the language means:

So p = (char *)66; reads to me as "assign 66 to p", and as mentioned by others, the (char *) is a cast. It is casting (changing the type of) 66 to that of char * which is known as a pointer to a char. Or, the address of a character variable.

Essentially the entire line is saying "at the address 66, you will find a character", and assigns 66 to the pointer that was previously pointing to the character held in i.

The use of the asterisk (*) in this case, is different from the line *p = (char) 66; which means, "the value at p is 66, and it is a character value". So while the line we looked at first modified the address held in p, the second line modified the value at the address already held in p.

Also, that last line ( (*p)++ ) means: "Take the value of p, and add 1 to it, whatever it is."

Please bear in mind, these aren't the textbook answers to this question, this is how you think about the question before you answer it. Also, if that was really the code you were given in your test, it's important to note that it's a bad idea to do that in real life. In lines 4 and 5 you are modifying a random position in memory that probably doesn't even belong to your application, which can (and probably will) cause crashes and other nasty stuff to happen.

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