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I am trying to evaluate the speed-up of a simple cuda fortran code: increment of an array.

CPU version:

module simpleOps_m
contains
subroutine increment (a, b)
implicit none
integer , intent ( inout ) :: a(:)
integer , intent (in) :: b
integer :: i, n

n = size (a)
do i = 1, n
a(i) = a(i)+b
enddo

end subroutine increment
end module simpleOps_m


program incrementTest
use simpleOps_m
implicit none
integer , parameter :: n = 1024*1024*100
integer :: a(n), b

a = 1
b = 3


call increment (a, b)


if ( any(a /= 4)) then
write (* ,*) '**** Program Failed **** '
else
write (* ,*) 'Program Passed '
endif
end program incrementTest

GPU version:

module simpleOps_m
contains
attributes ( global ) subroutine increment (a, b)
implicit none
integer , intent ( inout ) :: a(:)
integer , value :: b
integer :: i, n

n = size (a)

do i=blockDim %x*( blockIdx %x -1) + threadIdx %x ,n, BlockDim %x* GridDim %x
    a(i) = a(i)+b
end do

end subroutine increment
end module simpleOps_m

program incrementTest
use cudafor
use simpleOps_m
implicit none
integer , parameter :: n = 1024*1024*100
integer :: a(n), b
integer , device :: a_d(n)
integer :: tPB = 256

a = 1
b = 3

a_d = a
call increment <<< 128,tPB >>>(a_d , b)
a = a_d

if ( any(a /= 4)) then
write (* ,*) '**** Program Failed **** '
else
write (* ,*) 'Program Passed '
endif
end program incrementTest

So I compile both versions with pgf90 http://www.pgroup.com/resources/cudafortran.htm

Using "time" command to evaluate execution time, I obtain:


for CPU version

$ time (cpu executable)

real 0m0.715s

user 0m0.410s

sys 0m0.300s


for GPU version

$ time (gpu executable)

real 0m1.057s

user 0m0.710s

sys 0m0.340s


So the speed-up=(CPU exec.time)/(GPU exec.time) is < 1 Are there some reason why the speed-up is not > 1 as one should attain?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
3  
I can't comment on this in any detail, I haven't read your code and have no experience of CUDA Fortran. But in general, I wouldn't form any conclusions on speed-up based on the run time of one job which takes about 1s. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that moving data to and from the GPU's local memory takes more time than computation on the GPU saves in a relatively short job. –  High Performance Mark Jul 23 '12 at 13:24
1  
Exactly, even without the memory trasfers, acquiring of the GPU and allocation takes some time. –  Vladimir F Jul 23 '12 at 13:32
    
When benchmarking CUDA or OpenCL code there should be a first "warm-up" kernel execution so that all contexts could be properly acquired and initialised before the actual benchmarking process starts so not to interfere with the timing. Still, there is a certain computation to volume of memory transfers ratio that if not met would lead to poor performance. –  Hristo Iliev Jul 23 '12 at 14:25
2  
I would profile you host CPU version - I suspect that a=3 might be taking as much of the total execution time that the actual vector addition. Ahmdahl's law will start to work against you pretty fast in that case.... –  talonmies Jul 23 '12 at 14:34
1  
+1 to @talonmies comment -- a quick gprof points out that the a=1 line takes ~32% of the time, with the increment operation only taking ~44% of the time. So even without memory copy overhead, etc, the available speedup is very modest for this simple program. –  Jonathan Dursi Jul 23 '12 at 18:29

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