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I am trying to create a function with spin.js. The function loads the spinner, then if it is called again with it argument, then it stops the spinner. I can't get the variable scope right. So when I call the function to stop, I get an undefined on the submitSpinner.

http://jsfiddle.net/atlchris/tQdZB/1/

function submitSpinner(stopSpinner) {
    var theSubmitSpinner;

    if (stopSpinner === true) {
        theSubmitSpinner.stop();

        $('#overlay').remove();
    }
    else {
        $('body').append('<div id="overlay"><div id="spinner"></div></div>');

        theSubmitSpinner = new Spinner({
            lines: 13,
            length: 15,
            width: 5,
            radius: 20,
            color: '#ffffff',
            speed: 1,
            trail: 60,
            shadow: false
        }).spin(document.getElementById("spinner"));
    }
}

submitSpinner();

$(function() {
    $('#overlay').on('click', function() {
        alert('click');
        submitSpinner(true);
    });
});​
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why don't you return the Spinner object from the function, and let the caller call .stop() on it when its time? Reads better, and it doesn't have to pollute the local scope with random variables, also makes the submitSpinner() simpler.

function createSubmitSpinner() {

    $('body').append('<div id="overlay"><div id="spinner"></div></div>');

    return new Spinner({
        lines: 13,
        length: 15,
        width: 5,
        radius: 20,
        color: '#ffffff',
        speed: 1,
        trail: 60,
        shadow: false
    }).spin(document.getElementById("spinner"));
}


$(function() {
    var spinner = createSubmitSpinner();
    $('#overlay').on('click', function() {
        alert('click');
        spinner.stop();
    });
});
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2  
This is a good solution, though it's still a bit strange that the element is created inside createSubmitSpinner and the event handlers are bound outside of it. But I guess we are not talking about perfect code design here ;) –  Felix Kling Jul 23 '12 at 13:20
    
well, i admit that it certainly does. (-: –  complex857 Jul 23 '12 at 13:40

What is the problem? As you already know it is an scope issue, just move the variable declaration outside the function to make it global and accessible from all function calls.

Yet, it might be better not to make it global, but move the stopping function (which is only called from the click handler) into the same scope:

function createSpinner() {
    var overlay = $('<div id="overlay">'),
        spinner = $('<div id="spinner">');
    $('body').append(overlay.append(spinner));
    var submitSpinner = new Spinner({
        lines: 13,
        length: 15,
        width: 5,
        radius: 20,
        color: '#ffffff',
        speed: 1,
        trail: 60,
        shadow: false
    }).spin(spinner);

    overlay.on('click', function() {
        submitSpinner.stop();
        overlay.remove();
    });
}

$(function() {
    createSpinner();
});
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Move "var theSubmitSpinner;" outside the function: http://jsfiddle.net/nXbaz/

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submitSpinner(true);

Because you have one overload in your scope so you must provide one.

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