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I've been working with the problem for a while. Right now I have a device sending out UDP messages to a multicast group. I wrote a small Java program that can detect these packets by joining the group and looking to the right port. I use the MulticastSocket.receive(packet); command. I am moving on to writing a program with a GUI for this purpose. I want a user to be able to specify an amount of time, and for my program to look for packets for this amount of time. I've done a lot of research and found that the best way of doing this, cutting off the receive command when it is blocking a port, is to close the port prematurely. In order to do this, I have my program open up another thread, and use the new thread to watch for the UDP packets while my main thread sleeps for the specified time. It is detecting the packets just fine. However, I cannot seem to access it from the main thread to close the port. Here is my code:

import java.io.*;

import java.net.*;

import java.util.*;

import javax.swing.*;

public class MulticastClient_v2 extends Thread
{

public volatile MulticastSocket socket; 

public void run()
{
    try {
        //Declare the port and IGMP Group IP
        MulticastSocket socket2 = new MulticastSocket(5000);
        InetAddress address = InetAddress.getByName("224.0.1.2");

        //Display connection information
        System.out.println("Joining 224.0.1.2 on port 5000");

        //Join the Multicast Group
        socket.joinGroup(address);

        //Declaring a DatagramPacket
        DatagramPacket packet;

        //Starting an infinite loop
        //while (true)
        //{
            System.out.println("Waiting on packets..");
            byte[] buf = new byte[1024];
            packet = new DatagramPacket(buf, buf.length); //Declaring an internal DatagramPacket
            socket.receive(packet); //Receiving a Packet

            String received = new String(packet.getData(), 0, packet.getLength());
            InetAddress senderAddress = packet.getAddress(); //Get the InetAddress object
            String forFun = senderAddress.getHostAddress(); //Extract the IP address of sender in text format
            if (received.indexOf("Product1") >= 0) //Searching the raw data for "Product1"
            {
                //If found, display the IP and device type
                System.out.println("Product1 found at " + senderAddress);

            }
            if (received.indexOf("Product2") >= 0) //Searching the raw data for "Product2"
            {
                //If found, display the IP and device type
                System.out.println("Product2 found at " + senderAddress);
            }

        //}
    }
    catch(IOException ex)
    {
        System.out.println (ex.toString());
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{   
    MulticastClient_v2 thread = new MulticastClient_v2();
    thread.start();
    try {
    Thread.sleep( 3000 );
    thread.socket2.close();
    }
    catch(InterruptedException in)
    {
        System.out.println("Interrupted Exception!");
    }
    System.out.println("Done.");
}
}

So, when I try to compile, I get the following error:

MulticastClient_v2.java:63: error: cannot find symbol
    thread.socket2.close();
          ^
symbol:   variable socket2

It seems to me, that the main method cannot see socket2 with is in another method. My question is how to I make it available to see? I experimented a bit with the

public volatile MulticastSocket socket;

and the main method can access it, but I can't connect to a certain port when I'm in the run method. The only thing I could find that may do this is bind(). But bind() requires both an IP and a port, whereas when I first declare a Multicast socket, I can declare just the port like so:

MulticastSocket socket2 = new MulticastSocket(5000);

Any help would be very much appreciated! I've been stuck on this a while now.

EDIT: I've gotten some suggestions. First, that I should declare and initialize at the class level, this is giving me the following IO error:

MulticastClient_v2.java:8: error: unreported exception IOException; must be caught
or declared to be thrown
public volatile MulticastSocket socket = new MulticastSocket(5000); 
                                         ^

So next, I tried putting it in a try..catch block at the class level, and I get this:

MulticastClient_v2.java:8: error: illegal start of type
try{
^

So I guess what I really need to do is initialize the Multicast Port at the class level then put it in a try block inside a method, as JTMon suggested. But I can't figure out a way to pick just its port without doing it during initialization.

EDIT 2: I'm having difficulty still. If I try to initialize it like so in the class level:

public volatile MulticastSocket socket;

How can I edit its port later on in the run() method?

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3 Answers

I will try to put some code here to explain what I meant exactly. Declare the variable socket2 at the class level.

The MulticastClient_v2 class should have a public consturctor of the type:

public MulticastClient_v2(int portNumber){
    try{
        socket2 = new MulticastSocket(portNumber);
    }catch(IOException e){
        //Do something with exception here
    }
}

If the port number does not change you can hard code it in but this way is more flexible. In the run method you can now use the initialized socket and you can still access it from outside the class. Just for the record though I would prefer you make the access through another method on the thread, but that might be a discussion for another thread ;)

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Isn't socket2 declared as a local variable inside the run method? It would not be accessible from anywhere outside that method. Try declaring it at the class level first and see what happens.

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I've tried declaring it at the class level before but it throws an IOException. So I try to put it in a "try..throw", but it says I have to do that within a method. –  user1546011 Jul 23 '12 at 14:12
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socket2 is a local variable, so it's scope is just the try block in which it is defined. Using a MulticastClient_v2 instance you could only access fields of that class.

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've tried declaring it at the class level before but it throws an IOException. So I try to put it in a "try..throw", but it says I have to do that within a method. –  user1546011 Jul 23 '12 at 14:13
    
Declare it as a field and initialize it in the constructor –  tibtof Jul 23 '12 at 14:14
    
Declare the variable at the class level and use it in a try catch inside the method and then post the IO error details and we will try again to solve it..... or someone else will ;) –  JTMon Jul 23 '12 at 14:15
    
I updated the post above –  user1546011 Jul 23 '12 at 14:24
    
Make a constructor, with a try-catch block inside the constructor and initialize socket2 there. I still don't understand why you need two sockets. –  tibtof Jul 23 '12 at 14:26
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