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Can I initialize string after declaration?

char *s;
s = "test";

instead of

char *s = "test"; 
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You need to allocate the memory required by the string in the first case. It's done automatically for you in the second. –  OmnipotentEntity Jul 23 '12 at 14:02
    
@OmnipotentEntity: nope, in both cases s points to a read-only string allocated statically. –  Matteo Italia Jul 23 '12 at 14:03
    
better you should try this... –  Nandkumar Tekale Jul 23 '12 at 14:04
    
Ah, you are correct. –  OmnipotentEntity Jul 23 '12 at 14:04
    
What is the difference between two? –  user1301568 Jul 23 '12 at 14:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can, but keep in mind that with that statements you are storing in s a pointer to a read-only string allocated elsewhere. Any attempt to modify it will result in undefined behavior (i.e., on some compilers it may work, but often will just crash). That's why usually you use a const char * for that thing.

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is "test" string literal on stack? –  Nandkumar Tekale Jul 23 '12 at 14:08
    
What is the difference between two? –  user1301568 Jul 23 '12 at 14:09
    
@Nandkumar: no, it's allocated like a global. –  Matteo Italia Jul 23 '12 at 14:13
    
@user1301568: there's no substantial difference. –  Matteo Italia Jul 23 '12 at 14:14

It is correct for pointers (as mentioned above) because the string inside quotes is allocated from the compiler at compile time, so you can point to this memory address. The problems comes when you try change its contents or when you have a fixed size array that want to point there

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Yes, you can.

#include <stdio.h>

int 
main(void)
{
    // `s' is a pointer to `const char' because `s' may point to a string which
    // is in read-only memory.
    char const *s;
    s = "hello";
    puts(s);
    return 0;
}

NB: It doesn't work with arrays.

#include <stdio.h>

int 
main(void)
{
    char s[32];
    s = "hello"; // Syntax error.
    puts(s);
    return 0;
}
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