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I have three tables, A B and C. For every entry in A x B (where x is a Cartesian product, or cross join) there is an entry in C.

In other words, the table for C might look like this, if there were 2 entries for A and 3 for B:

| A_ID | B_ID | C_Val |
----------------------|
|  1   |  1   |  100  |
|  1   |  2   |  56   |
|  1   |  3   |  19   |
|  2   |  1   |  67   |   
|  2   |  2   |  0    |
|  2   |  3   |  99   |

Thus, for any combination of A and B, there's a value to be looked up in C. I hope this all makes sense.

In practice, the size of A x B may be relatively small for a database, but far too large to populate by hand for testing data. Thus, I would like to randomlly populate C's table for whatever data may already be in A and B.

My knowledge of SQL is fairly basic. What I've determined I can do so far is get that cartesian product as an inner query, like so:

(SELECT B.B_ID, C.C_ID
 FROM B CROSS JOIN C)

Then I want to say something like follows:

INSERT INTO A(B_ID, C_ID, A_Val) VALUES
    (SELECT B.B_ID, C.C_ID, FLOOR(RAND() * 100)
     FROM B CROSS JOIN C)

Not surprisingly, this doesn't work. I don't think its valid syntax to genereate a column on the fly like that, nor to try to insert a whole table as values.

How can I basically convert this normal programming pseudocode to proper SQL?

foreach(A_ID in A){
    foreach(B_ID in B){
        C.insert(A_ID, B_ID, Rand(100));
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The syntax problem is because:

INSERT INTO A(B_ID, C_ID, A_Val) VALUES
  (SELECT B.B_ID, C.C_ID, FLOOR(RAND() * 100)
   FROM B CROSS JOIN C)

Should be:

INSERT INTO A(B_ID, C_ID, A_Val) 
  SELECT B.B_ID, C.C_ID, FLOOR(RAND() * 100)
   FROM B CROSS JOIN C;

(You don't use VALUES with INSERT/SELECT.)

However you will still have the problem that RAND() is not evaluated for every row; it will have the same value for every row. Assuming the combination of B_ID and C_ID is unique, you can use something like this:

INSERT INTO A(B_ID, C_ID, A_Val) 
  SELECT B.B_ID, C.C_ID, ABS(CHEKSUM(RAND(B.B_ID*C.C_ID))) % 100
   FROM B CROSS JOIN C;
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It will take some time..I guess to get used maybe untill we get a score of 45.8 K like Aaron :).I am still not used to comments.I always forget and press enter and my comment get posted.With comment worst thing is that it can be edited just for five minutes... –  Gulli Meel Jul 23 '12 at 15:09
    
Working answer and great explanation too. Thanks! –  Nick Miceli Jul 23 '12 at 15:14
select A_id,B_Id, abs(checksum(newid()))%101 as C_val from A cross join B

This will give you different values in ranmge 0 to 100

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Use CTE

  With cte as
  (SELECT B.B_ID, C.C_ID, ABS(CAST(CAST(NEWID() AS VARBINARY) AS INT)) as A_Val
    FROM B CROSS JOIN C) 
  Insert into Table(B_ID, C_ID, A_Val)
  Select B_ID,C_ID,A_Val from cte

Since rand generates the same number you can use NEWID .Source

share|improve this answer
    
This is a whole lot of extra scaffolding for a simple INSERT/SELECT. And doesn't solve the RAND() issue. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 23 '12 at 14:57
    
Then possibly he can use NEWID which will return different value for each row –  praveen Jul 23 '12 at 15:01
    
Maybe, but your solution doesn't really solve either problem IMHO. All you've done is make the syntax needlessly complex. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 23 '12 at 15:08
    
CTE and apply are two features which are sometimes used unnecessarily..I guess it now becomes habit to use these.. –  Gulli Meel Jul 23 '12 at 15:16

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