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I don't use tables a lot, but when I do get some tabular data it goes in a table. But I was wondering if there was a better, or proper, way of aligning cells other than using empty cells.

For example, I'm working with a checkout table that lists each product, price, etc in a row adding as many rows as needed. At the end, there's the standard sub, shipping, total fields.

Now they want the last section all on the right and this is a pretty standard setup that I've come across. Not everyone has it that way but enough that I've seen it. So I'm not against it, but the only way I can see to do it is to add a lot of empty cells to get the aligning correct.

<tr>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td>Sub-Total</td>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td><!--This cell should be empty--></td>
    <td>Total</td>
</tr>

Since I normally try to follow semantics pretty closely, this doesn't feel right. Like I'm missing something. But in other areas, some cells just aren't filled becuase there is no particular data to put there, i.e. if one product has an option but the other products don't. So it can't be wrong since those fields MUST be empty. So I'm caught and don't really know if this is right, wrong, opinion, or what.

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the colspan attribute. You will likely want to right-align the text in that column with CSS:

<tr>
    <td colspan="6">Sub-Total</td>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td colspan="6">Total</td>
</tr>
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Totally forgot about colspan and rowspan. You can guess how often I use tables. I almost always let the backend generate them. Thanks. –  o_O Jul 23 '12 at 20:33
    
You do need to align right though (either in tags or in CSS) otherwise it will sit awkwardly on the left (unless your site is Arabic or Hebrew etc) –  Daniel Casserly Jul 24 '12 at 8:02
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Combine the empty cells with colspan and keep the cell with a value separate. The column headers (<th scope="col">) are pointing to the wrong cell otherwise because all combined cells are assigned to the first column where colspan was used.

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Instead of 5 empty cells, you can use <td colspan="5"></td>. Then you can include the cell containing a sub-total or total as a normal cell. This lets you handle the alignment of that cell separately, instead of treating it as spanning several columns.

Empty cells may cause some issues in rendering (you may wish to use &nbsp; as content and/or the CSS rule empty-cells: show for this reason), but logic is hardly an issue here.

However, for a final row that contains some total sum in the last column (it’s not clear whether this is what you nean), it would be better to have some explanation there, e.g.

<tr>
   <td colspan="5">Total</td>
   <td>$42,000,000</td>
</tr>
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This is exactly what I meant. Thanks. I do remember colspan but I haven't used tables since the my first HTML class in college a long time ago. Nowadays when data needs to be presented in tables I just let what backend generate it how they want. Also, I was using the comments both for people to know I wanted them empty and because it renders them with content instead of collapsing the empty cells. I think that's what you were meaning with the non-break space. –  o_O Jul 23 '12 at 20:25
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Probably the best way is to set the colspan="#" the number of columns these rows span and then set the align="right"

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