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I've looked through other questions on this error but they're not helping me. I'm still new to C++ and I don't know if I'm misunderstanding something, misusing something, or just plain missing something but I can't figure out what and I need some help. My error I'm getting is

SpriteImage does not name a type

Sprite.cpp

#include "Sprite.h"
#include "SDL/SDL.h"
#include "SDL/SDL_image.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

namespace ColdFusion
{
Sprite::Sprite()
{
    bufferSize = 100;
}

void Sprite::addToBuffer(SpriteImage img)
{
    if(SpriteBuffer->size() == bufferSize)
    {
        bufferSize *= 2;
        SpriteBuffer->resize(bufferSize);
    }
    SpriteBuffer->push_back(img);
}

SpriteImage Sprite::getFromBuffer(int index) //**Here is the error**
{
    return SpriteBuffer[index];
}

void Sprite::removeFromBuffer(int index)
{
    SpriteBuffer->erase(SpriteBuffer.begine()+index);
}

void Sprite::removeFromBuffer(SpriteImage index)
{
    for(int j = 0; j <= SpriteBuffer->size(); j++)
    {
        if(SpriteBuffer[j].name == index.name)
        {
            removeFromBuffer(j);
        }
    }
}

void Sprite::applyToScreen(SpriteImage img, SDL_Surface* destination)
{
    applyImage(img.x, img.y,getImage(img.filepath),destination)
}

SDL_Surface* Sprite::getImage(std::string filepath)
{
    SDL_Surface* optimized = NULL;
    SDL_Surface* loaded = NULL;
    loaded = IMG_Load(filepath.c_str());

    if(loaded != NULL)
    {
        optimized = SDL_DisplayFormat(loaded);
        SDL_FreeSurface(loaded);
        return optimized;
    }
    return NULL;
}

void Sprite::applyImage(int x, int y, SDL_Surface* source, SDL_Surface* destination)
{
    SDL_Rect offset;
    offset.x = x;
    offset.y = y;
    SDL_BlitSurface(source, NULL, destination, &offset);
}

Sprite::~Sprite()
{

}
}

Sprite.h

#ifndef SPRITE_H
#define SPRITE_H

#include "SDL/SDL.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

namespace ColdFusion
{
class Sprite
{
    public:
        Sprite();
        ~Sprite();
        typedef struct SpriteImage{
            int x;
            int y;
            std::string name;
            std::string filepath;
        };
        void addToBuffer(SpriteImage img);
        SpriteImage getFromBuffer(int index);
        void removeFromBuffer(int index);
        void removeFromBuffer(SpriteImage index);
        void applyToScreen(SpriteImage img, SDL_Surface* destination);

    protected:
    private:
        int bufferSize;
        std::vector<SpriteImage> SpriteBuffer[100];
        SDL_Surface* image;
        SDL_Surface* getImage(std::string filepath);
        void applyImage(int x, int y, SDL_Surface* source, SDL_Surface* destination);

};
}

#endif
share|improve this question
6  
Try Sprite::SpriteImage. –  chris Jul 23 '12 at 15:34
    
I'm completely guessing because I don't know C++ but since SpriteImage is defined inside Sprite doesn't it need to be Sprite::SpriteImage –  Jon Taylor Jul 23 '12 at 15:35
    
@chris Yeah, that fixed it. Thanks! –  Zexanima Jul 23 '12 at 15:36
    
By the way, you can also remove the typedef, it's useless with struct and class definitions. –  Morwenn Jul 23 '12 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

SpriteImage is a nested type and you have to qualify it with the name of its surrounding class to access it, when you are outside of the scope of the containing class. Use Sprite::SpriteImage. It also would make sense to take the parameter to addToBuffer by const& to avoid to many copy constructions. (Probably they end up being optimized away, but it is good practice).

Instead of a raw array, you can also use std::array or boost::array. On second though: The declaration std::vector<SpriteImage> SpriteBuffer[100]; probably doesn't declare what you think it does.

share|improve this answer
    
Alright, thanks for the heads up. I'm not to familiar with C++ yet. I think that's declaring a vector of SpriteImages with a size of 100, or am I wrong? –  Zexanima Jul 23 '12 at 15:46
    
@Zexanima No, that declares an array of vector<SpriteImage> with size 100. You only want vector<SpriteImage>. vector is variable sized and you don't need to specify its size. There is a reserve member function if you have an idea how much data you are going to store. –  pmr Jul 23 '12 at 15:52
    
Ohhh, okay. That makes sense. Thanks! –  Zexanima Jul 23 '12 at 15:55

When used as a return type, you're not in the naming space of the class, so you need to qualify SpriteImage:

Sprite::SpriteImage Sprite::getFromBuffer(int index) //**Here is the error**
{
    return SpriteBuffer[index];
}
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