Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am rendering a HTML table through Django. In this table, some of the cells or columns contain "0"'s as produced by my python code.

Is there any way in HTML to override that cell or column and for it to show instead a blank in the table cell rather than a 0?

I am using jQuery as well, if that helps.

<tr><td> Value</td>

{% for num in list %}
    <td> <b>{{num}}</b>
{% endfor %}</td>
</tr>

Output is a list which contains 3 zero's...out of which I want two blanked out.

Lets say if I have something being returned that is

0
10
0
20 
0

But want

""
10
""
20
0


    $(".dem").each(function() {
        for ( var i = 0; i<2; i++)
        {
            if ($(this).html() == "0") {
            $(this).html(" ");         
            }
            i = i+1
        }
    });

I did that ^....however it turned all 3 zeros blank...why? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Wait a minute. So you have a list of zeros but you only want it to show one zero, regardless of how many there are? –  simbabque Jul 23 '12 at 16:52
    
Ok, so you now have HTML code that says <b>0</b><b>10</b><b>0</b><b>20</b>? And you want to get rid of all 0 but one. Correct? –  simbabque Jul 23 '12 at 16:53
    
Yes, I want to get rid of the first two, but not the third. And it's not that simple, its more like that is the list that is rendered through <tr><td> Value</td> {% for num in list %} <td> <b>{{num}}</b> {% endfor %}</td> </tr> –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:57
    
And am running jQuery on that {{num}} <td> tag to filter that out, that <td class="dem"> –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:58
    
What does the HTML look like? I don't understand the template syntax. –  simbabque Jul 23 '12 at 17:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See the last edit for my final answer. I'm leaving the rest in to show how important it is to ask a good question, and to show what was tried, what the input looked like and what the expected output should have been. That would have saved a lot of time.


Using jQuery, you can iterate over each table cell, check the value and change what it outputs. I prefer this over changing the actual data. It's better to leave your data intact and only change the way it is displayed here.

$("#test td").each(function() {
    if ($(this).html() == "0") {
        $(this).html("");
    }
});

You can see it in action here.

Update:

If only some <td>s should be changed, I recommend using a class for those.

$(".noZeroAllowed").each(function() {
    if ($(this).html() == "0") {
        $(this).html("");
    }
});

It works with HTML like this:

<table id="test">
    <tr>
        <td class="noZeroAllowed">10</td>
        <td class="noZeroAllowed">5</td>
        <td>0</td>
        <td>1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="noZeroAllowed">11</td>
        <td class="noZeroAllowed">0</td>
        <td>9</td>
        <td>7</td>
    </tr>
</table>

Also see the updated fiddle.

Update 2:

If the data is not atomic and the cells have multiple values in them, like this:

<table id="test">
    <tr>
        <td class="noZeroAllowed">10 0 foobar 0</td>
        <td class="noZeroAllowed">5</td>
        <td>0, 0, 0</td>
        <td>1</td>
    </tr>
</table>

Then you need to change the Javascript to use a regular expression instead. The \b means a word boundary. It will not work with decimals like 0.5 though.

$(".noZeroAllowed").each(function() {
    var newStr = $(this).html().replace(/\b0\b/g, "");
    $(this).html(newStr);
});

See the updated fiddle.

Update 3:

This will turn all the zeros inside of <b> tags in the relevant class <td>s into empty strings, but leave the last zero intact.

$(".noZeroAllowed").each(function() {
    var zeros = new Array;
    var b = $(this).find("b");
    for (var i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        $(b[i])
        if ($(b[i]).html() == "0") {
            zeros.push(b[i]);
        }
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < zeros.length - 1; i++) {
        $(zeros[i]).html("");
    }
});

See it here.

share|improve this answer
    
If I wanted to use it just one on particular row, or cell, can I set that to run on that id only? So if i had <td id="test1"> would it just be $(#test1).each(function() etc. etc.? –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:16
    
$("#test1").each or $('td#test1').each. You do need the quotes around it. See my updated fiddle. You can play around with that, too. –  simbabque Jul 23 '12 at 16:29
    
Thanks. Unfortunately, in the list that I am rendering out in my table, there are multiple zeros of which I only want to blank out two...and they are all covered by the same <td> tag....I'm guessing no solution for this huh –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:32
    
That is something else entirely than your original question. You did not say the data was not atomic. Let me edit this again while you please add sample input and output to your question. –  simbabque Jul 23 '12 at 16:34
    
I changed the code to work with that, too. –  simbabque Jul 23 '12 at 16:49

If the zeros are the only thing that evaluates false, you can use the default template filter:

{{ value|default:"&nbsp;" }}

You may need to use the actual unicode character

{{ value|default:"\u00A0" }}

In response to your edit:

<tr><td> Value</td>

{% for num in list %}
    <td> <b>{{ num|default:"\u00A0" }}</b>
{% endfor %}</td>
</tr>

For changing only the first row:

<tr><td> Value</td>

{% for num in list %}
    <td> <b>{% if forloop.first %}&nbsp;{% else %}{{ num }}{% endfor %}</b>
{% endfor %}</td>
</tr>

For more on the forloop variables, check here.

share|improve this answer
    
This works, but unfortunately I realized that I only want some of those zero's to turn into blanks and some to not....any fix to this? jQuery? –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:23
    
That doesnt seem to work for some reason –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:26
    
@user1530318 how doesn't it work? –  Colin Dunklau Jul 23 '12 at 16:33

You could use Django's templates (see documentation):

{% if val != 0 %}{{ val }}{% endif %}

Alternatively, if you want something neater, you could use a Django filter in a template:

{{ val | default: "" }}

... Colin beat me to that one. ;) See the documentation for the 'default' filter.

EDIT: In answer to your comment, you'd do it like this:

{% for num in list %}
    <td><b>{{num | default: ""}}</b></td>
{% endfor %}

Note that you had your </td> outside the for loop, whereas it needs to be inside.

share|improve this answer
    
Check out the edit I just made....how would I use the django defualt filter in that? –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:07
    
@user1530318: See code snippet in edit. –  Scotty Jul 23 '12 at 16:10
    
TemplateSyntaxError at /test Could not parse the remainder: ' | default: ""' from 'num | default: ""' –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:16
    
Oh jk, I found out that i was doing something wrong, thanks! –  user1530318 Jul 23 '12 at 16:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.