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I have a big object I want to convert to JSON and send. However it has circular structure. I want to toss whatever circular references exist and send whatever can be stringified. How do I do that?

Thanks.

var obj = {
  a: "foo",
  b: obj
}

I want to stringify obj into:

{"a":"foo"}
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3  
Could you please post a sample object with a circular reference that you'd like to parse ? –  TWickz Jul 23 '12 at 16:33
    
@TWickz okay done! –  Harry Jul 23 '12 at 16:49
1  
something like this? –  Alvin Wong Jul 23 '12 at 16:58
    
possible duplicate of serializing object that contains cyclic object value –  Oleg V. Volkov Jul 23 '12 at 17:00
    
Late to the party but there is a github project to handle this. –  Preston S May 30 at 19:35
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7 Answers 7

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Use JSON.stringify with a custom replacer. For example:

// Demo: Circular reference
var o = {};
o.o = o;

var cache = [];
JSON.stringify(o, function(key, value) {
    if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null) {
        if (cache.indexOf(value) !== -1) {
            // Circular reference found, discard key
            return;
        }
        // Store value in our collection
        cache.push(value);
    }
    return value;
});
cache = null; // Enable garbage collection

The replacer in this example is not 100% correct (depending on your definition of "duplicate"). In the following case, a value is discarded:

var a = {b:1}
var o = {};
o.one = a;
o.two = a;
// one and two point to the same object, but two is discarded:
JSON.stringify(o, ...);

But the concept stands: Use a custom replacer, and keep track of the parsed object values.

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There was a small bug in your code but the overall idea I understand, thanks! –  Harry Jul 23 '12 at 18:27
    
@Harry What's the bug? I'll gladly fix the answer, if there are any inaccuracies in it. –  Rob W Jul 23 '12 at 19:10
    
You should be checking typeof value not typeof cache –  Harry Jul 23 '12 at 19:16
    
By the way - I ran into an interesting scenario. Someone printed the attrs parameters in an AngularJS directive. I think this object is just too big to be printed. Chrome gives up after 2582 keys. So I added to my solution a cache length limit. –  guy mograbi Jul 21 '13 at 15:09
1  
@CruzDiablo Serializing DOM is usually meaningless. However, if you can think of a meaningful serialization method for your purposes, then you could try to add a custom serialized to DOM objects: Node.prototype.toJSON = function() { return 'whatever you think that is right'; }; (if you want anything more generic/specific, just try anything in the prototype tree: HTMLDivElement implements HTMLElement implements Element implements Node implements EventTarget; note: this may be browser-dependent, the previous tree is true for Chrome) –  Rob W Mar 12 at 16:57
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In Node.js, you can use util.inspect(object). It automatically replaces circular links with "[Circular]".

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2  
Just for good measure: To Install: "npm install util" In your code: "var util = require('util');" –  QueueHammer Dec 10 '13 at 16:29
3  
util is a built-in module, you do not have to install it. –  Mitar Feb 15 at 4:55
1  
It's a shame I can't upvote more. util.inspect can be used from browserify too! –  Kamil Tomšík Mar 16 at 6:25
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I really liked Trindaz's solution - more verbose, however it had some bugs. I fixed them for whoever likes it too.

Plus, I added a length limit on my cache objects.

If the object I am printing is really big - I mean infinitely big - I want to limit my algorithm.

JSON.stringifyOnce = function(obj, replacer, indent){
    var printedObjects = [];
    var printedObjectKeys = [];

    function printOnceReplacer(key, value){
        if ( printedObjects.length > 2000){ // browsers will not print more than 20K, I don't see the point to allow 2K.. algorithm will not be fast anyway if we have too many objects
        return 'object too long';
        }
        var printedObjIndex = false;
        printedObjects.forEach(function(obj, index){
            if(obj===value){
                printedObjIndex = index;
            }
        });

        if ( key == ''){ //root element
             printedObjects.push(obj);
            printedObjectKeys.push("root");
             return value;
        }

        else if(printedObjIndex+"" != "false" && typeof(value)=="object"){
            if ( printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] == "root"){
                return "(pointer to root)";
            }else{
                return "(see " + ((!!value && !!value.constructor) ? value.constructor.name.toLowerCase()  : typeof(value)) + " with key " + printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] + ")";
            }
        }else{

            var qualifiedKey = key || "(empty key)";
            printedObjects.push(value);
            printedObjectKeys.push(qualifiedKey);
            if(replacer){
                return replacer(key, value);
            }else{
                return value;
            }
        }
    }
    return JSON.stringify(obj, printOnceReplacer, indent);
};
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You're missing a null check on this line : return "(see " + (!!value.constructor ? value.constructor.name.toLowerCase() : typeof(value)) + " with key " + printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] + ")"; –  Isak Aug 24 '13 at 17:13
    
I will gladly add it. just let me know what is nullable as I did experience any problems so far. –  guy mograbi Sep 2 '13 at 9:05
    
I hit the error when I tried it on a mouse event object. –  Isak Sep 3 '13 at 16:59
1  
@Isak I edited the code to include the null check. –  Orwellophile Oct 8 '13 at 23:32
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Use the JSON.stringify method with a replacer. Read this documentation for more information. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc836459%28v=vs.94%29.aspx

var obj = {
  a: "foo",
  b: obj
}

var replacement = {"b":undefined};

alert(JSON.stringify(obj,replacement));

Figure out a way to populate the replacement array with cyclic references. You can use the typeof method to find if an the property is of type 'object' ( reference ) and an exact equality check ( === ) to verify circular reference.

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3  
This might only work in IE (considering the fact that MSDN is documentation from Microsoft, and Microsoft creates IE). In Firefox/Chrome, jsfiddle.net/ppmaW generates the circular reference error. FYI: var obj = {foo:obj} does not create a circular reference. Instead, it creates an object whose foo attribute refers to the previous value of obj (undefined if not previously defined, declared because of var obj). –  Rob W Jul 23 '12 at 18:10
    
@RobW whoops, thanks for that, of course you're right –  Harry Jul 23 '12 at 18:28
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Note that there is also a JSON.decycle method implemented by Douglas Crockford. See his cycle.js. This allows you to stringify almost any standard structure:

var a = [];
a[0] = a;
a[1] = 123;
console.log(JSON.stringify(JSON.decycle(a)));
// result: '[{"$ref":"$"},123]'.

You can also recreate original object with retrocycle method. So you don't have to remove cycles from objects to stringify them.

However this will not work for DOM Nodes (which are typical cause of cycles in real life use-cases). For example this will throw:

var a = [document.body];
console.log(JSON.stringify(JSON.decycle(a)));

I've made a fork to solve that problem (see my cycle.js fork). This should work fine:

var a = [document.body];
console.log(JSON.stringify(JSON.decycle(a, true)));
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1  
Both his code and yours give me a "RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded" when I use them. –  jcollum Apr 29 at 18:17
    
I can have a look if you provide your code on the Fiddle or add an issue on Github: github.com/Eccenux/JSON-js/issues –  Nux Apr 30 at 16:12
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For future googlers searching for a solution to this problem when you don't now the keys of all circular references, you could use a wrapper around the JSON.stringify function to rule out circular references. See an example script at https://gist.github.com/4653128.

The solution essentially boils down to keeping a reference to previously printed objects in an array, and checking that in a replacer function before returning a value. It's more constrictive than only ruling out circular references, because it also rules out ever printing an object twice, one of the side affects of which is to avoid circular references.

Example wrapper:

function stringifyOnce(obj, replacer, indent){
    var printedObjects = [];
    var printedObjectKeys = [];

    function printOnceReplacer(key, value){
        var printedObjIndex = false;
        printedObjects.forEach(function(obj, index){
            if(obj===value){
                printedObjIndex = index;
            }
        });

        if(printedObjIndex && typeof(value)=="object"){
            return "(see " + value.constructor.name.toLowerCase() + " with key " + printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] + ")";
        }else{
            var qualifiedKey = key || "(empty key)";
            printedObjects.push(value);
            printedObjectKeys.push(qualifiedKey);
            if(replacer){
                return replacer(key, value);
            }else{
                return value;
            }
        }
    }
    return JSON.stringify(obj, printOnceReplacer, indent);
}
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Nice code. You have a silly error though, you write if(printedObjIndex) while you should write if(printedObjIndex==false) because index can also be 0 which is translated to false unless you explicitly state otherwise. –  guy mograbi Jul 21 '13 at 13:14
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If

console.log(JSON.stringify(object));

results in a

TypeError: cyclic object value

Then you may want to print like this:

var output = '';
for (property in object) {
  output += property + ': ' + object[property]+'; ';
}
console.log(output);
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A down-vote really ??? Please explain !! –  Thorsten Niehues Oct 26 '13 at 11:51
3  
Maybe because it only prints one level? –  Alex Turpin Dec 19 '13 at 23:52
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