Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My stopping here is the result of searching the internet for 3 days trying to find something that I was sure already exists, but I am unable to find it.

First off, I am no programmer. I was 35 years ago but not any longer.

This is the problem: 15 boys and 15 girls seated boy/girl/boy/girl 6 to a table with 5 tables then have everyone change to different boy/girl/boy/girl up to 4 times.

So my logic is:

  1. Number 1 to 30, with odds being boys and evens being girls -- these should be variable but equal, meaning not always will there be 30 kids in total, but anywhere from 12 to 80 (always being divisible by two so there will always be a pair).
  2. Pair 1 boy with 1 girl randomly from the total boy/girl count without repeating.
  3. Group the result in 5 sets of 6.
  4. Then repeat the process up to four more times while never matching the same two boy/girl combinations previously paired.

Would anyone know if this is possible? If so could it be done in Excel? If not, the suggestion of a standalone windows program would work as well.

I am trying to do this for charity events where teen boys and girls are in a social mix while meeting new folks. They are from all around the world, and I'm trying to get them to meet everyone.

I have been doing this manually for a few years but never seem to be able to make it always work out. The programmer that was in me thinks that there has to be a programming solution for this problem.

I would appreciate any advice you can offer.

share|improve this question
2  
You only have to pick the first positions at random, then just move all the (eg) boys along by one position (or one table) each time you switch. Assuming boy/girl pair is the only constraint, and you don't want to mix the tables up more with each round... –  Tim Williams Jul 23 '12 at 18:23
    
Depending on how many people you have (and people per table), and keeping groups with half boys and half girls, then it may not be possible to have a unique group every time (even after the first swap) and it may require more swaps than you have time for to have everyone sit with everyone else at some point. You can see this by using Tim's method on paper. I would suggest looking up "the handshake problem" for potential solutions to your problem that optimize the # of visits to meet (almost) everyone. I will try to add more to this and provide an answer later this evening. Good luck. –  Zairja Jul 23 '12 at 21:00
add comment

1 Answer

After doing a bit more digging, this appears to be a variation of the Social Golfer Problem. There are several algorithms out there, some relying on brute force or heuristics. It should absolutely be doable in VBA, but you can probably find existing code/apps out there to accomplish the task.

I'll continue looking into this, but let us know if you find an online "scheduler" that solves your problem.

Edit:

This could be one solution for 6 tables of 5 kids, but it won't ensure the half boy/girl constraint. According to this results page:

For m groups of n players where m < n, it is impossible to find a group of n players for week 2 who all come from different week 1 groups (since there are only m of them).

For m groups of n players, each player plays with n-1 other players each week. Since there are a total of mn-1 other players, this means a player runs out of partners after (mn-1)/(n-1) weeks.

Therefore 5 groups of 6 kids would have repeats. By the 2nd formula, a kid would run out of partners after 5 turns.

5 weeks play in 6 groups of 5 golfers

[ 1 2 3 4 5 | 6 7 8 9 10 | 11 12 13 14 15 | 16 17 18 19 20 | 21 22 23 24 25 | 26 27 28 29 30]

[ 1 6 11 16 21 | 2 7 12 17 26 | 3 8 13 22 27 | 4 9 18 23 28 | 5 14 19 24 29 | 10 15 20 25 30]

[ 1 8 12 20 28 | 2 6 14 22 30 | 3 9 11 17 24 | 4 7 16 25 29 | 5 15 18 21 27 | 10 13 19 23 26]

[ 1 14 17 25 27 | 2 9 13 20 21 | 3 10 12 18 29 | 4 6 15 24 26 | 5 8 16 23 30 | 7 11 19 22 28]

[ 1 9 15 22 29 | 2 10 16 24 27 | 3 7 14 20 23 | 4 12 19 21 30 | 5 6 13 17 28 | 8 11 18 25 26]

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.