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I want to convert a string that I get from a file, to an arraylist. I tried it this way, but it doesn't work:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Data
{
    static File file = DataSaver.file;
    static List<String> data = new ArrayList<String>(512);
    public static void a() throws Exception
    {
        FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file);
        DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(fis);
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(dis));
        if(!file.exists())
        {
            throw new IOException("Datafile not found.");
        }
        else
        {
            String[] string = reader.readLine().split("$");
            for(int i = 0; i < string.length; i++)
            {
                data.add(string[i]);
            }
        }
        dis.close();
        System.out.println(data.toString()); //for debugging purposes.
    }
}

Ouput: [$testdata1$testdata2$]

Wanted output: [testdata1, testdata2]

File content: $testdata1$testdata2$

Can someone help me?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you calling an array of String 'string'? –  David B Jul 23 '12 at 18:17
    
Why not? You have a problem with the word 'string'? –  ROLLER Jul 23 '12 at 18:25
    
It's a bad variable name. Java may allow it because it's not case-sensitive with it's classes, but that wouldn't work in C# (where string is an alias for String). Furthermore, it doesn't really describe what's contained in the variable. –  David B Jul 23 '12 at 18:26
    
Please don't use DataInputStream if you want to read text, its more confusing than useful. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 15 '12 at 11:33
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

String.split takes a regex and $ is a special char that need to be escaped. Also, the first char is a $ so splitting would end up with an empty first element (you need to remove it somehow, this is one way:

String[] string = reader.readLine().substring(1).split("\\$");

...or:

String[] string = reader.readLine().split("\\$");
for (int i = 0; i < string.length; i++)
    if (!string[i].isEmpty())
        data.add(string[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That worked –  ROLLER Jul 23 '12 at 18:20
    
No problem @user1546467, glad to have helped! :) –  dacwe Jul 23 '12 at 18:30
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1. Use ("\\$") to remove the special meaning of "$".

2. Use Arrays.asList() for the Conversion of Array TO ArrayList

From Java Docs :

Returns a fixed-size list backed by the specified array. (Changes to the returned list "write through" to the array.) This method acts as bridge between array-based and collection-based APIs, in combination with Collection.toArray(). The returned list is serializable and implements RandomAccess.

This method also provides a convenient way to create a fixed-size list initialized to contain several elements:

eg:

String[] string = reader.readLine().split("\\$");

ArrayList<String> arr = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(string));
share|improve this answer
    
@dacwe Isnt the List from Arrays.asList() directly backed by the array? Which would mean almost no overhead. –  Stefan Jul 23 '12 at 20:31
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You need to escape special characters with \\.

Change your split statement like below

String[] string = reader.readLine().split("\\$");
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Adding to @dacwe

String[] string = reader.readLine().substring(1).split("\\$");
List<String> data =Arrays.asList(string);
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to contribute to his answer, edit it or leave a comment. –  David B Jul 23 '12 at 18:27
    
Alright, but @user1546467 wanted an ArrayList (asList returns a list backed by the array). –  dacwe Jul 23 '12 at 18:29
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