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For this code

struct test {};
test f() { return test(); }
void print(test *x) {}
int main()
{
    print(&f());
    print(&test());
}

gcc-4.6 emits two "taking address of temporary [-fpermissive]" errors. This was introduced in 4.6, gcc-4.5 could compile it.

The reason is pretty clear and well documented. The problem is that it is a legacy code and, to compile, we have to make it work, thus, doing #pragmas around files and/or parts of code to compile them with -fpermissive. Let's say, customers are adamant not to modify the existing code (i.e. the fact of calling print() with &f() or &test() cannot be changed, not source files in general). In other words, one way or another this will be compiled, the only choice is more or less pain.

So the question is - are there any possible workarounds to make it work without doing -fpermissive in lots of places? -W flags, C++ tricks, etc.

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You can't do "C++ tricks" if you can't change the code, yes? So what can you change? Are we just talking compiler flags? How did your customers get it to compile? –  Nicol Bolas Jul 23 '12 at 18:23
    
This code can be compiled using MSVC and gcc-4.5. What I can change, I have no particular idea. For example, redefine/overload print() or make it a macro that does local var under gcc-4.6. Any crazy idea (or "dirty hack" if you prefer) is interesting enough. –  queen3 Jul 23 '12 at 18:31
    
There simply is no trick to getting &test() to work. You have to change something about the callsite or the return type of f() to get around the problem. –  GManNickG Jul 23 '12 at 18:38
1  
@queen3: That code is invalid, and it is incorrectly accepted by two compilers. Options are simple: correct the code (which will make it compile in all platforms/compilers) or restrict yourself to the broken compilers or other compiler tricks. In any sane situation you should opt for making things right, not forcing the compiler to munch your errors. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 18:38
    
There's already a fix which is putting #pragmas around. Please read the question - one way or another, it will be compiled. –  queen3 Jul 23 '12 at 18:41
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What I meant is, the fact of calling print() with &f() or &test() cannot be changed.

If you have control over the type itself, you can always overload the reference operator, operator&, and return this from it. It's not a good thing to do in the general case, but it's fairly safe considering that you're returning the correct pointer of the correct type.

If base classes are involved, then it becomes rather more complicated. You'll need to use a virtual operator overload, and each class in the hierarchy will need to implement it separately.

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1  
This will probably break in different cases, like if test is a base (suddenly base::operator& becomes the best match for &d where d is of a type derived from base... if test is aligned with the complete object it will yield a pointer to the correct address but of the different type, if the objects are not aligned then it will return a pointer to the wrong type and addresses) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 19:23
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Noted. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 23 '12 at 19:27
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: yes this is a good tip, thanks. We will have to take this into account. But usually these are simple cases like &custom_color_class(). –  queen3 Jul 23 '12 at 19:30
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Why not just rewrite the code to do exactly what the compiler used to do without complaining? In other words, store your temporary in a temporary (but addressable) variable.

struct test {};
test f() { return test(); }
void print(test *x) {}
int main()
{
    test t1 = f();
    test t2 = test();
    print(&t1);
    print(&t2);
}

This should behave identically to the way it did with the old compiler version. Tell the customer that the new compiler requires you to change the code to be explicit about something the compiler used to do implicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
See "The problem is that it is a legacy code" in the question. –  queen3 Mar 7 '13 at 19:01
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It is not clear to me how much control you have over what, but the following hack seems to work:

Edit: Originally had f return a reference instead of a copy. DeadMG correctly points out this leads to undefined behavior as soon as the temporary gets used, so restored f back to returning a copy.

struct test {};
const test & test_copy (const test &t) { return t; }
#define test() test_copy(test())
test f() { return test(); }
#define f() test_copy(f())
void print(const test *) {}
int main()
{
    print(&f());
    print(&test());
}

The hack is to basically convert your temporaries into const references, so that the compiler will be happier. It shouldn't be made generally available, it's only purpose is to shut the compiler up. But, it doesn't really solve any underlying problems with the customer code or provided API. You could fix your API, and only resort to the hacks for certain customers:

struct test {};
test f() { return test(); }
void print(const test &) {}

#define CUSTOMER_NEEDS_HACK
#ifdef CUSTOMER_NEEDS_HACK
const test & test_copy (const test &t) { return t; }
#define test() test_copy(test())
#define f() test_copy(f())
void print(const test *t) { print(*t); }
#endif
share|improve this answer
4  
Welcome to undefined behaviour. –  Puppy Jul 23 '12 at 19:33
    
In f you return a reference to a temporary. test_copy won't be UB in the case of test() but could be in other scenarios. –  Puppy Jul 23 '12 at 19:34
5  
So you've fixed the UB by ... creating other massive problems by abusing a global variable that cannot ever work in a non-trivial actual program. Not sure if improvement. –  Puppy Jul 23 '12 at 19:38
1  
@DeadMG: I would like more input on the downvote, so I know what else to improve. Thanks! –  jxh Jul 23 '12 at 19:59
    
@DeadMG: The only purpose of test_copy is to quiet the compiler, which is what the OP had asked. Is that still the reason for the downvote? Thanks –  jxh Jul 23 '12 at 20:12
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You can provide a workaround by creating an extra print overload that will take a const&:

void print( test const & t ) {
   print(&t);             // Assuming that the function is 'print( test const * )'
                          // a print function should not take a non-const pointer!
}

And changing the caller to:

print( f() );

This requires code changes, but in a very limited form, so it might be acceptable. Also note that

share|improve this answer
    
@NicolBolas: I realized that while rereading my answer and corrected it (well, rather than corrected, I added the assumption that a print function should not take a pointer to a mutable object) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 18:25
    
No, I cannot change caller in this way, i.e. it should be &f(), &test(). –  queen3 Jul 23 '12 at 18:29
    
@queen3: That is invalid code, and the compiler is right in rejecting it. You should not force the compiler to accept incorrect code, but rather correct the code to be proper. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 18:36
1  
@queen3: There is a saying in Spanish (don't take it wrong, I don't mean to offend): 10 Trillion flies cannot be wrong, eat shit!. The fact that 2 compilers or 10 trillion flies like something does not mean that it is right. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 23 '12 at 18:40
1  
@queen3 I don't know if you should do it or not but you can overload & operator in test if you just want to do it anyway : ideone.com/rfUGs –  Mr.Anubis Jul 23 '12 at 18:40
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