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See the image. The form little rectangles have different line widths. The line pointing towards the big center rect are thicker. Take the top left one for instance: the to line and the left one are thinner than the right one and the bottom one. First I though it was an optical illusion, but no. The screenshot was taken on the Simulator at 100%.

enter image description here

The code used to draw the view below is from DrawRect() of a subclass of UIView:

public override void Draw (RectangleF rect)
        {
            rect = this.Bounds;
            CGContext oCtx = UIGraphics.GetCurrentContext();
            oCtx.SetFillColor(UIColor.Clear.CGColor);
            oCtx.ClearRect(rect);

            oCtx.SetLineWidth(2f);

            oCtx.SetFillColor(this.BackgroundColor.CGColor);
            oCtx.SetStrokeColor(this.BackgroundColor.CGColor);
            oCtx.SetAlpha(this.Alpha);

            oCtx.AddRect(new RectangleF(rect.X + HANDLE_WIDTH * 0.5f, rect.Y + HANDLE_HEIGHT * 0.5f, rect.Width - HANDLE_WIDTH, rect.Height - HANDLE_HEIGHT));

            oCtx.FillPath();

            oCtx.SetAlpha(1f);
            oCtx.AddRect(new RectangleF(rect.X, rect.Y, HANDLE_WIDTH, HANDLE_HEIGHT));
            oCtx.AddRect(new RectangleF(rect.Right - HANDLE_WIDTH, rect.Y, HANDLE_WIDTH, HANDLE_HEIGHT));
            oCtx.AddRect(new RectangleF(rect.Right - HANDLE_WIDTH, rect.Bottom - HANDLE_HEIGHT, HANDLE_WIDTH, HANDLE_HEIGHT));
            oCtx.AddRect(new RectangleF(rect.X, rect.Bottom - HANDLE_HEIGHT, HANDLE_WIDTH, HANDLE_HEIGHT));

            oCtx.StrokePath();

#if DEBUG
            oCtx.SetAlpha(0.2f);
            oCtx.SetFillColor(UIColor.DarkGray.CGColor);
            oCtx.AddRect(this.GetMovableArea(rect));
            oCtx.FillPath();
#endif
        }

Can somebody please explain why the stroke widths differ? I also tried to use StrokeRect() instead - same result. I even removed all the drawing code, except the top left rectangle without change. The constants HANDLE_HEIGHT and HANDLE_WIDTH are both set to 20f.

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Does this problem occur on a real iPad? I would think not. It is quite possible that the simulator does not perform anti-aliased rendering - which is why you see that effect. –  ananthonline Jul 23 '12 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is due to CoreGraphics using a center pen alignment e.g. It will draw pixels either side of the line that you specify. As you have noticed bringing the co-ordinate in by half the line width will fix it.

This article has an example and also talks about anti aliasing that iOS applies to the line and how you can avoid it.

http://www.raywenderlich.com/2033/core-graphics-101-lines-rectangles-and-gradients

In our case, the edge of the path is the rectangle we wish to fill. So when drawing a 1 >pixel line along that edge, half of the line (1/2 pixel) will be on the inside of the >rectangle, and the other half of the line (1/2 pixel) will be on the outside of the >rectangle.

But of course, since there’s no way to draw 1/2 a pixel, instead Core Graphics uses anti->aliasing to draw in both pixels, but just a lighter shade to give the appearance that it >is only a single pixel drawn.

I don't think you can change this in CG unlike GDI+ where you can set a pens alignment http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z62ath7a.aspx

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Yeah, that seems to be the cause in this case. –  Krumelur Jul 24 '12 at 7:03

What's the value of this UIView ClipsToBounds property ?

If true then that's likely your issue (half of the 2pt line is outside the bounds).

UPDATE

What does calling GetClipBoundingBox on your CGContext returns ?

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Does not change anything if I play with that property. However if I paint the rect at rect.X + 1 instead of rect.X, the lines are correct. But why would rect.X (== 0) be out of the clipping area!? I also get the same effect if I make the line width 1 instead of 2 btw. –  Krumelur Jul 23 '12 at 20:36
    
Just a quick guess ;-) I have not tried it with CG and details vary with drawing toolkits. Often drawing a 2pt wide line at 0 often creates a rectangle from -1,1 (2 pt wide) the part from -1,0 could be clipped and would show like your screenshot. Moving the line to 1 (center) makes the drawing from 0,2 (2 pt wide) and inside the clipping. A 1pt wide line would be -0.5,0,5 which would also cut half it's part (clipped to 0). –  poupou Jul 23 '12 at 20:49

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